“Pitching” posttraumatic stress disorder treatment: A qualitative study of how providers discuss evidence-based psychotherapies with patients

Katinka Hooyer, Jessica Hamblen, Shannon M. Kehle-Forbes, Sadie E. Larsen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The two widely available evidence-based psychotherapies (EBPs) for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are cognitive processing therapy and prolonged exposure. Although the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has invested in intensive clinical training to provide these first-line treatments, most military veterans do not receive these therapies. Prior research indicates that patient interest and motivation depend on how patients are educated, and differences in how information is presented shape their decision-making. To our knowledge, no studies have addressed how clinicians “pitch” EBPs for PTSD and examined whether certain approaches are more effective than others. We recorded and thematically analyzed 25 treatment planning sessions across 10 VA sites in the United States to better understand how providers talk to patients about treatment options. Five themes were identified: using rich description, integrating various forms of questioning to engage the patient, sharing prior patient success stories, using inviting and direct language, and tailoring therapy talk to fit patient needs. Providers learning to offer EBPs can use these strategies to serve as a “menu” of options that will allow them to present EBPs in a way that appeals to a particular patient.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Traumatic Stress
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2024

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2024 The Authors. Journal of Traumatic Stress published by Wiley Periodicals LLC on behalf of International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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