Pitch, harmonicity and concurrent sound segregation: Psychoacoustical and neurophysiological findings

Christophe Micheyl, Andrew J. Oxenham

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

    62 Scopus citations

    Abstract

    Harmonic complex tones are a particularly important class of sounds found in both speech and music. Although these sounds contain multiple frequency components, they are usually perceived as a coherent whole, with a pitch corresponding to the fundamental frequency (F0). However, when two or more harmonic sounds occur concurrently, e.g., at a cocktail party or in a symphony, the auditory system must separate harmonics and assign them to their respective F0s so that a coherent and veridical representation of the different sounds sources is formed. Here we review both psychophysical and neurophysiological (single-unit and evoked-potential) findings, which provide some insight into how, and how well, the auditory system accomplishes this task. A survey of computational models designed to estimate multiple F0s and segregate concurrent sources is followed by a review of the empirical literature on the perception and neural coding of concurrent harmonic sounds, including vowels, as well as findings obtained using single complex tones with mistuned harmonics.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)36-51
    Number of pages16
    JournalHearing Research
    Volume266
    Issue number1-2
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jul 1 2010

    Keywords

    • Auditory scene analysis
    • Complex tones
    • Double vowels
    • Fundamental frequency
    • Harmonicity
    • Mistuned harmonic
    • Pitch

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Pitch, harmonicity and concurrent sound segregation: Psychoacoustical and neurophysiological findings'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this