Physical resilience in older adults: Systematic review and development of an emerging construct

H.E. Whitson, W. Duan-Porter, K.E. Schmader, M.C. Morey, H.J. Cohen, C.S. Colón-Emeric

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Resilience has been described in the psychosocial literature as the capacity to maintain or regain well-being during or after adversity. Physical resilience is a newer concept that is highly relevant to successful aging. Our objective was to characterize the emerging construct of resilience as it pertains to physical health in older adults, and to identify gaps and opportunities to advance research in this area. Methods. We conducted a systematic review to identify English language papers published through January 2015 that apply the term "resilience" in relation to physical health in older adults. We applied a modified framework analysis to characterize themes in implicit or explicit definitions of physical resilience. Results. Of 1,078 abstracts identified, 49 articles met criteria for inclusion. Sixteen were letters or concept papers, and only one was an intervention study. Definitions of physical resilience spanned cellular to whole-person levels, incorporated many outcome measures, and represented three conceptual themes: resilience as a trait, trajectory, or characteristic/capacity. Conclusions. Current biomedical literature lacks consensus on how to define and measure physical resilience. We propose a working definition of physical resilience at the whole person level: A characteristic which determines one's ability to resist or recover from functional decline following health stressor(s). We present a conceptual framework that encompasses the related construct of physiologic reserve. We discuss gaps and opportunities in measurement, interactions across contributors to physical resilience, and points of intervention. ©The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)489-495
Number of pages7
JournalJournals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
Volume71
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016

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Health
Aptitude
Consensus
Language
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Research

Bibliographical note

Cited By :28

Export Date: 26 December 2018

CODEN: JGASF

Correspondence Address: Whitson, H.E.; Duke University Center for Study of Aging, DUMC Box 3003, United States; email: heather.whitson@duke.edu

Funding details: Claude Pepper Older Americans Independence Center, Wake Forest School of Medicine, P30AG028716

Funding details: I21RX001721-01

Funding details: No.TPP 21-022

Funding details: Office of Academic Affiliations, Department of Veterans Affairs, OAA, VA, R01 NR003178-11S1

Funding details: National Institutes of Health, NIH, R24AG045050

Funding details: National Institutes of Health, NIH, R01AG043438

Funding details: U.S. Department of Defense, DOD, W81XWH-12-2-0093

Funding details: Alzheimer's Association, NIRG-13-282202

Funding text 1: This work was supported by the Duke Older American Independence Center (P30AG028716). Dr. Whitson is funded by the NIH (R01AG043438, R24AG045050), Alzheimer's Association (NIRG-13-282202), and VA Rehabilitation Research and Development (I21RX001721-01). Fellowship support for Dr. Duan-Porter was provided by Grant No.TPP 21-022 from the Department of Veteran Affairs Office of Academic Affiliations (VA OAA). Dr Col?n-Emeric is funded by the NIH (R01 NR003178-11S1) and Department of Defense (W81XWH-12-2-0093).

Keywords

  • Disablement process
  • Frailty
  • Physical function
  • Physiology
  • Successful aging
  • adaptation
  • adaptive behavior
  • aged
  • aging
  • coping behavior
  • fitness
  • human
  • physiology
  • psychology
  • very elderly
  • Adaptation, Physiological
  • Adaptation, Psychological
  • Aged
  • Aged, 80 and over
  • Aging
  • Humans
  • Physical Fitness
  • Resilience, Psychological

Cite this

Physical resilience in older adults: Systematic review and development of an emerging construct. / Whitson, H.E.; Duan-Porter, W.; Schmader, K.E.; Morey, M.C.; Cohen, H.J.; Colón-Emeric, C.S.

In: Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, Vol. 71, No. 4, 2016, p. 489-495.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Whitson, H.E. ; Duan-Porter, W. ; Schmader, K.E. ; Morey, M.C. ; Cohen, H.J. ; Colón-Emeric, C.S. / Physical resilience in older adults: Systematic review and development of an emerging construct. In: Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences. 2016 ; Vol. 71, No. 4. pp. 489-495.
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T1 - Physical resilience in older adults: Systematic review and development of an emerging construct

AU - Whitson, H.E.

AU - Duan-Porter, W.

AU - Schmader, K.E.

AU - Morey, M.C.

AU - Cohen, H.J.

AU - Colón-Emeric, C.S.

N1 - Cited By :28 Export Date: 26 December 2018 CODEN: JGASF Correspondence Address: Whitson, H.E.; Duke University Center for Study of Aging, DUMC Box 3003, United States; email: heather.whitson@duke.edu Funding details: Claude Pepper Older Americans Independence Center, Wake Forest School of Medicine, P30AG028716 Funding details: I21RX001721-01 Funding details: No.TPP 21-022 Funding details: Office of Academic Affiliations, Department of Veterans Affairs, OAA, VA, R01 NR003178-11S1 Funding details: National Institutes of Health, NIH, R24AG045050 Funding details: National Institutes of Health, NIH, R01AG043438 Funding details: U.S. Department of Defense, DOD, W81XWH-12-2-0093 Funding details: Alzheimer's Association, NIRG-13-282202 Funding text 1: This work was supported by the Duke Older American Independence Center (P30AG028716). Dr. Whitson is funded by the NIH (R01AG043438, R24AG045050), Alzheimer's Association (NIRG-13-282202), and VA Rehabilitation Research and Development (I21RX001721-01). Fellowship support for Dr. Duan-Porter was provided by Grant No.TPP 21-022 from the Department of Veteran Affairs Office of Academic Affiliations (VA OAA). Dr Col?n-Emeric is funded by the NIH (R01 NR003178-11S1) and Department of Defense (W81XWH-12-2-0093).

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N2 - Background. Resilience has been described in the psychosocial literature as the capacity to maintain or regain well-being during or after adversity. Physical resilience is a newer concept that is highly relevant to successful aging. Our objective was to characterize the emerging construct of resilience as it pertains to physical health in older adults, and to identify gaps and opportunities to advance research in this area. Methods. We conducted a systematic review to identify English language papers published through January 2015 that apply the term "resilience" in relation to physical health in older adults. We applied a modified framework analysis to characterize themes in implicit or explicit definitions of physical resilience. Results. Of 1,078 abstracts identified, 49 articles met criteria for inclusion. Sixteen were letters or concept papers, and only one was an intervention study. Definitions of physical resilience spanned cellular to whole-person levels, incorporated many outcome measures, and represented three conceptual themes: resilience as a trait, trajectory, or characteristic/capacity. Conclusions. Current biomedical literature lacks consensus on how to define and measure physical resilience. We propose a working definition of physical resilience at the whole person level: A characteristic which determines one's ability to resist or recover from functional decline following health stressor(s). We present a conceptual framework that encompasses the related construct of physiologic reserve. We discuss gaps and opportunities in measurement, interactions across contributors to physical resilience, and points of intervention. ©The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved.

AB - Background. Resilience has been described in the psychosocial literature as the capacity to maintain or regain well-being during or after adversity. Physical resilience is a newer concept that is highly relevant to successful aging. Our objective was to characterize the emerging construct of resilience as it pertains to physical health in older adults, and to identify gaps and opportunities to advance research in this area. Methods. We conducted a systematic review to identify English language papers published through January 2015 that apply the term "resilience" in relation to physical health in older adults. We applied a modified framework analysis to characterize themes in implicit or explicit definitions of physical resilience. Results. Of 1,078 abstracts identified, 49 articles met criteria for inclusion. Sixteen were letters or concept papers, and only one was an intervention study. Definitions of physical resilience spanned cellular to whole-person levels, incorporated many outcome measures, and represented three conceptual themes: resilience as a trait, trajectory, or characteristic/capacity. Conclusions. Current biomedical literature lacks consensus on how to define and measure physical resilience. We propose a working definition of physical resilience at the whole person level: A characteristic which determines one's ability to resist or recover from functional decline following health stressor(s). We present a conceptual framework that encompasses the related construct of physiologic reserve. We discuss gaps and opportunities in measurement, interactions across contributors to physical resilience, and points of intervention. ©The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved.

KW - Disablement process

KW - Frailty

KW - Physical function

KW - Physiology

KW - Successful aging

KW - adaptation

KW - adaptive behavior

KW - aged

KW - aging

KW - coping behavior

KW - fitness

KW - human

KW - physiology

KW - psychology

KW - very elderly

KW - Adaptation, Physiological

KW - Adaptation, Psychological

KW - Aged

KW - Aged, 80 and over

KW - Aging

KW - Humans

KW - Physical Fitness

KW - Resilience, Psychological

U2 - 10.1093/gerona/glv202

DO - 10.1093/gerona/glv202

M3 - Article

VL - 71

SP - 489

EP - 495

JO - Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences

JF - Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences

SN - 1079-5006

IS - 4

ER -