Physical origins of low surface tensions

Joseph A. Zasadzinski, A. von Nahmen, K. Graf, J. Ding, A. J. Waring

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The minimum surface tension and respreadability of a surfactant monolayer is limited by a two to three dimensional instability called collapse. Liquid-condensed or solid phase monolayers collapse via fracture followed by loss of material. Liquid-expanded monolayers collapse by solubilization into the subphase. Monolayers that retain a continuous LE phase network surrounding islands of LC or S phase collapse at lower surface tensions via a localized, large amplitude buckling. The buckled regions coexist with the flat monolayer, remain attached to the interface and are reversibly reincorporated into the monolayer upon expansion. Synthetic replacement surfactants must be designed to reproduce this unique phase behavior for optimal function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAnnual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings
PublisherIEEE
Number of pages1
ISBN (Print)0780356756
StatePublished - Dec 1 1999
EventProceedings of the 1999 IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology 21st Annual Conference and the 1999 Fall Meeting of the Biomedical Engineering Society (1st Joint BMES / EMBS) - Atlanta, GA, USA
Duration: Oct 13 1999Oct 16 1999

Publication series

NameAnnual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings
Volume1
ISSN (Print)0589-1019

Other

OtherProceedings of the 1999 IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology 21st Annual Conference and the 1999 Fall Meeting of the Biomedical Engineering Society (1st Joint BMES / EMBS)
CityAtlanta, GA, USA
Period10/13/9910/16/99

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