Physical, Emotional, and Sexual Abuse Among Pain Patients and Health Care Providers: Implications for Psychologists in Multidisciplinary Pain Treatment Centers

Robert L. Karol, Rebecca Gorman Micka, Michael Kuskowski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study surveyed 200 back pain patients and 64 health care providers/staff on their physical, emotional, and sexual abuse histories as victims or perpetrators. Depending on the type of abuse, 27%-36% of female patients, 6%-23% of male patients, and 33%-55% of female providers/staff were abuse victims. From 1%-12% of female patients, 3%-10% of male patients, and 3%-15% of providers/staff were abuse perpetrators, depending on the type of abuse. A startling 94% of abuse perpetrators were also abuse victims. Among those who were both victim and perpetrator, 81% of physical-abuse perpetrators, 60% of sexual-abuse perpetrators, and 41% of emotional-abuse perpetrators were previously or concurrently some type of abuse victim. The study discusses the implications for health care diagnoses and treatment decisions, caregiving by providers/staff, and the psychologist's role on multidisciplinary treatment teams.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)480-485
Number of pages6
JournalProfessional Psychology: Research and Practice
Volume23
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1992

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