Physical and mental health, cognitive development, and health care use by housing status of low-income young children in 20 American cities: A prospective cohort study

J.M. Park, A.R. Fertig, P.D. Allison

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives; We assessed the independent effect of homeless and doubled-up episodes on physical and mental health, cognitive development, and health care use among children. Methods: We used data from 4 waves of the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, involving a sample of 2631 low-income children in 20 large US cities who have been followed since birth. Multivariate analyses involved logistic regression using the hybrid method to include both fixed and random effects. Results: Of the sample, 9.8% experienced homelessness and an additional 23.6% had a doubled-up episode. Housing status had little significant adverse effect on child physical or mental health, cognitive development, or health care use. Conclusions: Family and environmental stressors common to many children in poverty, rather than just homeless and doubled-up episodes, were associated with young children's poor health and cognitive development and high health care use. Practitioners need to identify and respond to parental and family needs for support services in addition to housing assistance to effectively improve the health and development of young children who experience residential instability, particularly those in homeless families.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)S255-S261
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume101
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011

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Mental Health
Cohort Studies
Prospective Studies
Delivery of Health Care
Homeless Persons
Poverty
Child Development
Multivariate Analysis
Logistic Models
Parturition
Health
Child Health

Bibliographical note

Cited By :24

Export Date: 26 December 2018

CODEN: AJPEA

Correspondence Address: Park, J.M.1010 West Nevada Street, Urbana, IL 61801, United States; email: parkjm@illinois.edu

Keywords

  • article
  • child development
  • child welfare
  • cognition
  • cohort analysis
  • female
  • fitness
  • health care delivery
  • homelessness
  • housing
  • human
  • infant
  • male
  • mental health
  • physiology
  • poverty
  • preschool child
  • prospective study
  • standard
  • statistics
  • United States
  • urban population
  • utilization review
  • Child Development
  • Child Welfare
  • Child, Preschool
  • Cognition
  • Cohort Studies
  • Delivery of Health Care
  • Female
  • Homeless Youth
  • Housing
  • Humans
  • Infant
  • Male
  • Mental Health
  • Physical Fitness
  • Poverty
  • Prospective Studies
  • Urban Population

Cite this

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title = "Physical and mental health, cognitive development, and health care use by housing status of low-income young children in 20 American cities: A prospective cohort study",
abstract = "Objectives; We assessed the independent effect of homeless and doubled-up episodes on physical and mental health, cognitive development, and health care use among children. Methods: We used data from 4 waves of the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, involving a sample of 2631 low-income children in 20 large US cities who have been followed since birth. Multivariate analyses involved logistic regression using the hybrid method to include both fixed and random effects. Results: Of the sample, 9.8{\%} experienced homelessness and an additional 23.6{\%} had a doubled-up episode. Housing status had little significant adverse effect on child physical or mental health, cognitive development, or health care use. Conclusions: Family and environmental stressors common to many children in poverty, rather than just homeless and doubled-up episodes, were associated with young children's poor health and cognitive development and high health care use. Practitioners need to identify and respond to parental and family needs for support services in addition to housing assistance to effectively improve the health and development of young children who experience residential instability, particularly those in homeless families.",
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author = "J.M. Park and A.R. Fertig and P.D. Allison",
note = "Cited By :24 Export Date: 26 December 2018 CODEN: AJPEA Correspondence Address: Park, J.M.1010 West Nevada Street, Urbana, IL 61801, United States; email: parkjm@illinois.edu",
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AU - Allison, P.D.

N1 - Cited By :24 Export Date: 26 December 2018 CODEN: AJPEA Correspondence Address: Park, J.M.1010 West Nevada Street, Urbana, IL 61801, United States; email: parkjm@illinois.edu

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N2 - Objectives; We assessed the independent effect of homeless and doubled-up episodes on physical and mental health, cognitive development, and health care use among children. Methods: We used data from 4 waves of the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, involving a sample of 2631 low-income children in 20 large US cities who have been followed since birth. Multivariate analyses involved logistic regression using the hybrid method to include both fixed and random effects. Results: Of the sample, 9.8% experienced homelessness and an additional 23.6% had a doubled-up episode. Housing status had little significant adverse effect on child physical or mental health, cognitive development, or health care use. Conclusions: Family and environmental stressors common to many children in poverty, rather than just homeless and doubled-up episodes, were associated with young children's poor health and cognitive development and high health care use. Practitioners need to identify and respond to parental and family needs for support services in addition to housing assistance to effectively improve the health and development of young children who experience residential instability, particularly those in homeless families.

AB - Objectives; We assessed the independent effect of homeless and doubled-up episodes on physical and mental health, cognitive development, and health care use among children. Methods: We used data from 4 waves of the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, involving a sample of 2631 low-income children in 20 large US cities who have been followed since birth. Multivariate analyses involved logistic regression using the hybrid method to include both fixed and random effects. Results: Of the sample, 9.8% experienced homelessness and an additional 23.6% had a doubled-up episode. Housing status had little significant adverse effect on child physical or mental health, cognitive development, or health care use. Conclusions: Family and environmental stressors common to many children in poverty, rather than just homeless and doubled-up episodes, were associated with young children's poor health and cognitive development and high health care use. Practitioners need to identify and respond to parental and family needs for support services in addition to housing assistance to effectively improve the health and development of young children who experience residential instability, particularly those in homeless families.

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