Phosphorylation of nonhistone proteins during the HeLa cell cycle. Relationship to DNA synthesis and mitotic chromosome condensation.

M. K. Song, K. W. Adolph

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Cell cycle variations in the phosphorylation of chromatin-associated nonhistones were determined. Cells were radiolabeled with [32P]orthophosphate and chromatin was obtained by mild digestion of nuclei with micrococcal nuclease. The experiments were performed in the presence of a substrate inhibitor of alkaline phosphatase, beta-glycerophosphate. The results show that, while similar molecular weight species of phosphorylated nonhistones are associated with interphase chromatin through the HeLa cell cycle, the incorporation (32P cpm/micrograms of protein) profiles of selected major phosphononhistones show substantial changes. The most prominent peaks of specific radioactivity occur in the DNA synthesis phase (S phase). The phosphorylation states of the proteins of isolated metaphase chromosomes were also determined. Nonhistone proteins of isolated metaphase chromosomes are strikingly dephosphorylated, especially in comparison to histone H1. The phosphorylation of the major phosphononhistone of chromatin, which has a molecular weight of 55,000, was further characterized by techniques that included one-dimensional peptide mapping in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels and nonequilibrium pH gradient slab gel electrophoresis. Phosphoproteins are also components of the nuclear scaffold, and cell cycle variations in these proteins were investigated. The primary phosphorylated species has a molecular weight of 119,000. As with chromatin-associated nonhistones, this nuclear scaffold protein shows substantial incorporation of 32P in S phase, and a high level of incorporation also occurs close to mitosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3309-3318
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume258
Issue number5
StatePublished - Mar 10 1983

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