PHASE SEPARATION STUDIES IN RIM POLYURETHANES - CATALYST AND HARD SEGMENT CRYSTALLINITY EFFECTS.

R. E. Camargo, C. W. Macosko, M. Tirrell, S. T. Wellinghoff

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Studies have been conducted on simplified linear systems in order to establish the effect of reaction rates and mold temperatures on the phase separation and molecular weight of segmented polyurethane elastomers produced by RIM. This paper reports studies which have extended previous experiments to a wider spectrum of catalyst concentrations, at hard segment levels typical of those used in the production of RIM fascia automobile parts. To study the role of hard segment crystallizability, two series of polymers were prepared from 4,4 prime -diphenylmethane diisocyanate and 1,4-butanediol. In addition some comparative results have been obtained by varying the molecular weight of the polyols used.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationACS Symposium Series
EditorsJiri E. Kresta
PublisherACS
Pages27-51
Number of pages25
ISBN (Print)0841208883
StatePublished - 1985

Publication series

NameACS Symposium Series
ISSN (Print)0097-6156

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by Industry University Cooperative funding from the National Science Foundation, Grant NSF-CPE-8118-232, the General Motors Corporation and the Union Carbide Corporation. The authors are also indebted to Drs D. Spence and J. Ferrarini from Rubicon Chemicals, R. Lloyd from Texaco Chemicals, J. O'Connors from Olin Corp. and R. Gerkin and L. Lawler from Union Carbide for providing us with the raw chemicals used in this work. Invaluable assistance by K. Dulin, J. Horns and J. Andrews in sample preparation and characterization is acknowledged. One of the authors (R.E.C.) would also like to thank the 3M Company for fellowship support through this project.

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