Personalizing the dichotomy of fixed and flexible activities in everyday life: deriving prism anchors from GPS-enabled survey data

Yaxuan Zhang, Chunjiang Li, Ying Song, Yanwei Chai, Yingling Fan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Space–time prism is a fundamental concept in time geography that can model an individual’s accessibility to resources under space–time constraints. A prism anchor is often defined by work, school, or home activity with a fixed location and schedule. Trips and other activities are relatively flexible and scheduled between prism anchors. This fixity-flexibility dichotomy may not capture the increasing complexity of human mobility behaviors or variations among individuals. Recent developments in location-aware technologies allow us to collect person-level mobility data with detailed space–time paths and contextual information. This article develops methods to extract prism anchors from these GPS-based survey data and examines whether home, work, and school activities can always be used to define prism anchors for everyone. To illustrate our methods, we use data collected in Minnesota and Beijing as two study cases. Results in both study cases suggest that not everyone has home, work, or school anchors, and people with the same socio-demographic background tend to have similar anchor types. By deriving home, work, and school anchors, we can better understand how a person’s everyday schedules are governed by home, work, and school and refine person-based accessibility measures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalTransportation
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022, The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature.

Keywords

  • GPS-enable survey data
  • Space–time prism anchor
  • Time geography
  • Travel behavior

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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