Personality traits and endocrine response as possible asymmetry factors of agonistic outcome in karate athletes

Stefano Parmigiani, Harold Dadomo, Alessandro Bartolomucci, Paul F. Brain, Andrea Carbucicchio, Cosimo Costantino, Pier F. Ferrari, Paola Palanza, Riccardo Volpi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Scopus citations

Abstract

Individual variations of plasma levels of hormones testosterone (T) and cortisol (C), before (pre) and after (post) Kumite (real fight) and Kata (ritualized fight) were measured in male karate athletes and analyzed in relation with the agonistic outcome (i.e. winning or losing the fight) and personality trait measures. T and C increased only during Kumite contest and pre- and post-competition C levels were higher in losers than winners. Losers showed higher levels of harm avoidance and anxiety as well as lower level of novelty seeking than winners. Importantly, novelty seeking negatively correlates with pre C and the higher the level of risk assessment, emotionality and insecurity indexes the higher the pre C level. In conclusion, personality traits might be an important factor asymmetry between athletes influencing both the probability of winning or losing an agonistic interaction and the different anticipatory endocrine response to the incipient fight.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)324-333
Number of pages10
JournalAggressive Behavior
Volume35
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2009

Keywords

  • 16 Personality-factors
  • Aggression
  • Cortisol
  • Martial arts
  • Temperamental and character inventory

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    Parmigiani, S., Dadomo, H., Bartolomucci, A., Brain, P. F., Carbucicchio, A., Costantino, C., Ferrari, P. F., Palanza, P., & Volpi, R. (2009). Personality traits and endocrine response as possible asymmetry factors of agonistic outcome in karate athletes. Aggressive Behavior, 35(4), 324-333. https://doi.org/10.1002/ab.20306