Persistence and local extinction of lion prides in the Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania

Bernard M. Kissui, Anna Mosser, Craig Packer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

African lions (Panthera leo) live in social groups (prides) that exhibit group territorial behavior. Pride persistence is expected to depend on its ability to compete against neighboring prides as well as on average rates of reproduction and survival, thus providing a meaningful measure of intergenerational reproductive success. We used Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC) to select the best approximating models explaining how demographic variables influenced pride persistence during a 30-year period in the Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, and identified landscape factors affecting those demographic variables. Pride persistence to 10 years depended on adult female density (pride size) and cub productivity (the ultimate source of new females). Average age of adult females had a weakly positive influence on pride persistence, while the effect of female mortality was weakly negative. Adult female mortality increased with disease epidemics and in territories with high human disturbance. Cub productivity was highest in territories closest to rivers and only slightly higher near swamps, and also high in areas of higher vegetative cover and high human use. No landscape variable significantly affected female density. The growth and population size of the Crater lions was closely linked to demographic performance of individual prides, while territorial behavior played a key role in mediating the interactive effects of landscape and demography.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)103-111
Number of pages9
JournalPopulation Ecology
Volume52
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

Fingerprint

local extinction
Panthera leo
Tanzania
crater
extinction
persistence
demographic statistics
mortality
productivity
group behavior
Akaike information criterion
swamps
demography
swamp
reproductive success
population size
disturbance
rivers
river

Keywords

  • Anthropogenic factors
  • Disease outbreak
  • Landscape variables
  • Pride territory
  • Reproductive success
  • Territorial behavior

Cite this

Persistence and local extinction of lion prides in the Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania. / Kissui, Bernard M.; Mosser, Anna; Packer, Craig.

In: Population Ecology, Vol. 52, No. 1, 01.01.2010, p. 103-111.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{08a89c4eabf642f690ee9ebbfceb0225,
title = "Persistence and local extinction of lion prides in the Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania",
abstract = "African lions (Panthera leo) live in social groups (prides) that exhibit group territorial behavior. Pride persistence is expected to depend on its ability to compete against neighboring prides as well as on average rates of reproduction and survival, thus providing a meaningful measure of intergenerational reproductive success. We used Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC) to select the best approximating models explaining how demographic variables influenced pride persistence during a 30-year period in the Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, and identified landscape factors affecting those demographic variables. Pride persistence to 10 years depended on adult female density (pride size) and cub productivity (the ultimate source of new females). Average age of adult females had a weakly positive influence on pride persistence, while the effect of female mortality was weakly negative. Adult female mortality increased with disease epidemics and in territories with high human disturbance. Cub productivity was highest in territories closest to rivers and only slightly higher near swamps, and also high in areas of higher vegetative cover and high human use. No landscape variable significantly affected female density. The growth and population size of the Crater lions was closely linked to demographic performance of individual prides, while territorial behavior played a key role in mediating the interactive effects of landscape and demography.",
keywords = "Anthropogenic factors, Disease outbreak, Landscape variables, Pride territory, Reproductive success, Territorial behavior",
author = "Kissui, {Bernard M.} and Anna Mosser and Craig Packer",
year = "2010",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s10144-009-0176-y",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "52",
pages = "103--111",
journal = "Population Ecology",
issn = "1438-3896",
publisher = "Springer Japan",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Persistence and local extinction of lion prides in the Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania

AU - Kissui, Bernard M.

AU - Mosser, Anna

AU - Packer, Craig

PY - 2010/1/1

Y1 - 2010/1/1

N2 - African lions (Panthera leo) live in social groups (prides) that exhibit group territorial behavior. Pride persistence is expected to depend on its ability to compete against neighboring prides as well as on average rates of reproduction and survival, thus providing a meaningful measure of intergenerational reproductive success. We used Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC) to select the best approximating models explaining how demographic variables influenced pride persistence during a 30-year period in the Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, and identified landscape factors affecting those demographic variables. Pride persistence to 10 years depended on adult female density (pride size) and cub productivity (the ultimate source of new females). Average age of adult females had a weakly positive influence on pride persistence, while the effect of female mortality was weakly negative. Adult female mortality increased with disease epidemics and in territories with high human disturbance. Cub productivity was highest in territories closest to rivers and only slightly higher near swamps, and also high in areas of higher vegetative cover and high human use. No landscape variable significantly affected female density. The growth and population size of the Crater lions was closely linked to demographic performance of individual prides, while territorial behavior played a key role in mediating the interactive effects of landscape and demography.

AB - African lions (Panthera leo) live in social groups (prides) that exhibit group territorial behavior. Pride persistence is expected to depend on its ability to compete against neighboring prides as well as on average rates of reproduction and survival, thus providing a meaningful measure of intergenerational reproductive success. We used Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC) to select the best approximating models explaining how demographic variables influenced pride persistence during a 30-year period in the Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, and identified landscape factors affecting those demographic variables. Pride persistence to 10 years depended on adult female density (pride size) and cub productivity (the ultimate source of new females). Average age of adult females had a weakly positive influence on pride persistence, while the effect of female mortality was weakly negative. Adult female mortality increased with disease epidemics and in territories with high human disturbance. Cub productivity was highest in territories closest to rivers and only slightly higher near swamps, and also high in areas of higher vegetative cover and high human use. No landscape variable significantly affected female density. The growth and population size of the Crater lions was closely linked to demographic performance of individual prides, while territorial behavior played a key role in mediating the interactive effects of landscape and demography.

KW - Anthropogenic factors

KW - Disease outbreak

KW - Landscape variables

KW - Pride territory

KW - Reproductive success

KW - Territorial behavior

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=72949094891&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=72949094891&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10144-009-0176-y

DO - 10.1007/s10144-009-0176-y

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:72949094891

VL - 52

SP - 103

EP - 111

JO - Population Ecology

JF - Population Ecology

SN - 1438-3896

IS - 1

ER -