Peripheral postcapillary venous pressure: A new, more sensitive monitor of effective blood volume during hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation

Curtis A. Sheldon, Frank B. Cerra, Nancy Bohnhoff, Kumar Belani, David Frieswyk, Krishnanaik Dhanalal, Arnold S. Leonard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Peripheral postcapillary venous pressure (PCVP) and mixed venous oxygen saturation (Sv̄O2 or PASO2) have been shown to be sensitive indicators of volume status and appear to reflect the adequacy of peripheral perfusion during controlled bleeding. This study demonstrates that in an open-chest dog model with controlled venous return, PCVP is closely and linearly (r2 = 0.6) correlated with cardiac output (CO). Furthermore, oxygen saturation as measured in the central venous system (CVSO2) and peripheral vein (PVSO2) were found to be closely and linearly related to PASO2 (r = 0.72 to 0.99 and 0.91 to 0.98, respectively). Thus PCVP, CVSO2, and PVSO2 represent easily and safely obtainable parameters that closely reflect major physiologic variables. During resuscitation after controlled hemorrhage, the PCVP and PVSO2 accurately reflected the restoration of blood volume and were as good as CO and central saturations. Central venous and pulmonary wedge pressures both poorly reflected the return to full volume repletion (P<0.01). Thus, PCVP and PVSO2 seem to be reliable indices of volume status and perfusion and do not require invasive, central monitoring.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)399-406
Number of pages8
JournalSurgery
Volume94
Issue number2
StatePublished - Aug 1983

Fingerprint

Venous Pressure
Hemorrhagic Shock
Blood Volume
Resuscitation
Cardiac Output
Perfusion
Hemorrhage
Oxygen
Pulmonary Wedge Pressure
Veins
Thorax
Dogs

Cite this

Sheldon, C. A., Cerra, F. B., Bohnhoff, N., Belani, K., Frieswyk, D., Dhanalal, K., & Leonard, A. S. (1983). Peripheral postcapillary venous pressure: A new, more sensitive monitor of effective blood volume during hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation. Surgery, 94(2), 399-406.

Peripheral postcapillary venous pressure : A new, more sensitive monitor of effective blood volume during hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation. / Sheldon, Curtis A.; Cerra, Frank B.; Bohnhoff, Nancy; Belani, Kumar; Frieswyk, David; Dhanalal, Krishnanaik; Leonard, Arnold S.

In: Surgery, Vol. 94, No. 2, 08.1983, p. 399-406.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sheldon, CA, Cerra, FB, Bohnhoff, N, Belani, K, Frieswyk, D, Dhanalal, K & Leonard, AS 1983, 'Peripheral postcapillary venous pressure: A new, more sensitive monitor of effective blood volume during hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation', Surgery, vol. 94, no. 2, pp. 399-406.
Sheldon, Curtis A. ; Cerra, Frank B. ; Bohnhoff, Nancy ; Belani, Kumar ; Frieswyk, David ; Dhanalal, Krishnanaik ; Leonard, Arnold S. / Peripheral postcapillary venous pressure : A new, more sensitive monitor of effective blood volume during hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation. In: Surgery. 1983 ; Vol. 94, No. 2. pp. 399-406.
@article{657091e9f9574175aeca6926ef4057f3,
title = "Peripheral postcapillary venous pressure: A new, more sensitive monitor of effective blood volume during hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation",
abstract = "Peripheral postcapillary venous pressure (PCVP) and mixed venous oxygen saturation (Sv̄O2 or PASO2) have been shown to be sensitive indicators of volume status and appear to reflect the adequacy of peripheral perfusion during controlled bleeding. This study demonstrates that in an open-chest dog model with controlled venous return, PCVP is closely and linearly (r2 = 0.6) correlated with cardiac output (CO). Furthermore, oxygen saturation as measured in the central venous system (CVSO2) and peripheral vein (PVSO2) were found to be closely and linearly related to PASO2 (r = 0.72 to 0.99 and 0.91 to 0.98, respectively). Thus PCVP, CVSO2, and PVSO2 represent easily and safely obtainable parameters that closely reflect major physiologic variables. During resuscitation after controlled hemorrhage, the PCVP and PVSO2 accurately reflected the restoration of blood volume and were as good as CO and central saturations. Central venous and pulmonary wedge pressures both poorly reflected the return to full volume repletion (P<0.01). Thus, PCVP and PVSO2 seem to be reliable indices of volume status and perfusion and do not require invasive, central monitoring.",
author = "Sheldon, {Curtis A.} and Cerra, {Frank B.} and Nancy Bohnhoff and Kumar Belani and David Frieswyk and Krishnanaik Dhanalal and Leonard, {Arnold S.}",
year = "1983",
month = "8",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "94",
pages = "399--406",
journal = "Surgery",
issn = "0039-6060",
publisher = "Mosby Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Peripheral postcapillary venous pressure

T2 - A new, more sensitive monitor of effective blood volume during hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation

AU - Sheldon, Curtis A.

AU - Cerra, Frank B.

AU - Bohnhoff, Nancy

AU - Belani, Kumar

AU - Frieswyk, David

AU - Dhanalal, Krishnanaik

AU - Leonard, Arnold S.

PY - 1983/8

Y1 - 1983/8

N2 - Peripheral postcapillary venous pressure (PCVP) and mixed venous oxygen saturation (Sv̄O2 or PASO2) have been shown to be sensitive indicators of volume status and appear to reflect the adequacy of peripheral perfusion during controlled bleeding. This study demonstrates that in an open-chest dog model with controlled venous return, PCVP is closely and linearly (r2 = 0.6) correlated with cardiac output (CO). Furthermore, oxygen saturation as measured in the central venous system (CVSO2) and peripheral vein (PVSO2) were found to be closely and linearly related to PASO2 (r = 0.72 to 0.99 and 0.91 to 0.98, respectively). Thus PCVP, CVSO2, and PVSO2 represent easily and safely obtainable parameters that closely reflect major physiologic variables. During resuscitation after controlled hemorrhage, the PCVP and PVSO2 accurately reflected the restoration of blood volume and were as good as CO and central saturations. Central venous and pulmonary wedge pressures both poorly reflected the return to full volume repletion (P<0.01). Thus, PCVP and PVSO2 seem to be reliable indices of volume status and perfusion and do not require invasive, central monitoring.

AB - Peripheral postcapillary venous pressure (PCVP) and mixed venous oxygen saturation (Sv̄O2 or PASO2) have been shown to be sensitive indicators of volume status and appear to reflect the adequacy of peripheral perfusion during controlled bleeding. This study demonstrates that in an open-chest dog model with controlled venous return, PCVP is closely and linearly (r2 = 0.6) correlated with cardiac output (CO). Furthermore, oxygen saturation as measured in the central venous system (CVSO2) and peripheral vein (PVSO2) were found to be closely and linearly related to PASO2 (r = 0.72 to 0.99 and 0.91 to 0.98, respectively). Thus PCVP, CVSO2, and PVSO2 represent easily and safely obtainable parameters that closely reflect major physiologic variables. During resuscitation after controlled hemorrhage, the PCVP and PVSO2 accurately reflected the restoration of blood volume and were as good as CO and central saturations. Central venous and pulmonary wedge pressures both poorly reflected the return to full volume repletion (P<0.01). Thus, PCVP and PVSO2 seem to be reliable indices of volume status and perfusion and do not require invasive, central monitoring.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0020511909&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0020511909&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 6879451

AN - SCOPUS:0020511909

VL - 94

SP - 399

EP - 406

JO - Surgery

JF - Surgery

SN - 0039-6060

IS - 2

ER -