Perioperative factors that affect long-term adjustment to an incontinent ostomy

Vicki Haugen, Donna Z Bliss, Kay Savik

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

44 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: We sought to identify perioperative factors associated with long-term adjustment to an incontinent ostomy. METHODOLOGY: The Ostomy Adjustment Scale (OAS), a demographic form, and a $5 gift certificate were mailed to 200 ostomates. Associations between items from the Survey of Perioperative Factors of Ostomy Adjustment, demographic forms, and total OAS scores were assessed using bivariate and multiple linear regression analysis. Results: The survey response rate was 74%. About half (70/146, 49%) of the respondents were women, 99% (144/145) were Caucasian, and 74% (109/146) were married. Their mean age was 65 ± 14 years. Fifty-six percent (79/141) of the respondents had an ileostomy, 28% (39/141) had a colostomy, and 15% (21/141) had a urostomy. The mean OAS score for all the respondents was 159.5 ± 26.2, indicating a good overall adjustment to an incontinent ostomy. In bivariate analyses, the factor associated with a lower OAS score indicating poorer adjustment was distress related to affording and obtaining ostomy supplies. The more helpful the ostomates found the preoperative education provided by a wound, ostomy, and continence specialist nurse, the better was their adjustment as indicated by a higher OAS score. Having ongoing/recurrent illness and having an ostomy created by a specialty surgeon were also associated with better adjustment. When multiple factors were considered in a stepwise regression analysis, adjustment was lowered by distress about obtaining ostomy supplies. Adjustment was improved when preoperative education provided by a wound, ostomy, and continence specialist nurse was considered helpful for the ongoing/ recurrent illness. Conclusion: Many ostomates have a good long-term adjustment to ostomy surgery and value education provided by a wound, ostomy, and continence nurse. Perioperative patient education and addressing patient distress over obtaining supplies are areas that can benefit from wound, ostomy, and continence nurse intervention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)525-535
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nursing
Volume33
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2006

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