Periodontal disease, tooth loss and incident rheumatoid arthritis: Results from the First National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and its epidemiological follow-up study

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

75 Scopus citations

Abstract

Aims Infection may be a rheumatoid arthritis (RA) risk factor. We examined whether signs of periodontal infection were associated with RA development in the First National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and its epidemiological follow-up study. Material and Methods In 1971-1974, 9702 men and women aged 25-74 were enrolled and surveyed longitudinally (1982, 1986, 1987, 1992). Periodontal infection was defined by baseline tooth loss or clinical evidence of periodontal disease. Baseline (n = 138) and incident (n = 433) RA cases were defined via self-report physician diagnosis, joint pain/swelling, ICD-9 codes (714.0-714.9), death certificates and/or RA hospitalization. Results Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) (95% CI) for prevalent RA in gingivitis and periodontitis (versus healthy) were 1.09 (0.57, 2.10) and 1.85 (0.95, 3.63); incident RA ORs were 1.32 (0.85, 2.06) and 1.00 (0.68, 1.48). The ORs for prevalent RA among participants missing 5-8, 9-14, 15-31 or 32 teeth (versus 0-4 teeth) were 1.74 (1.03, 2.95), 1.82 (0.81, 4.10), 1.45 (0.62, 3.41) and 1.30 (0.48, 3.53); ORs for incident RA were 1.12 (0.77, 1.64), 1.67 (1.12, 2.48), 1.40 (0.85, 2.33) and 1.22 (0.75, 2.00). Dose-responsiveness was enhanced among never smokers. The rate of death or loss-to-follow-up after 1982 was two- to fourfold higher among participants with periodontitis or missing ≥9 teeth (versus healthy participants). Conclusions Although participants with periodontal disease or ≥5 missing teeth experienced higher odds of prevalent/incident RA, most ORs were non-statistically significant and lacked dose-responsiveness. Differential RA ascertainment bias complicated the interpretation of these data.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)998-1006
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of clinical periodontology
Volume38
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2011

    Fingerprint

Keywords

  • bias
  • cohort studies
  • infections
  • periodontal
  • rheumatoid arthritis

Cite this