Performance of Montessori and traditionally schooled nursery children on tasks of seriation, classification, and conservation

Jacqueline M. White, Steve Yussen, Edward M. Docherty

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

It was hypothesized that the Montessori curriculum accelerates the acquisition of a number of concrete operational skills. To test this, eighty 4-year-old children were given three Piagetian problems-seriation, classification, and conservation. Half of the subjects were from Montessori schools, and the other half were from more traditional nursery settings. Within each type of school, half of the children were first year and the other half were second year enrollees. Results showed that significantly more Montessori than traditional children seriated and classified objects like concrete thinkers but that there were no differences on the conservation problem. Year of enrollment did not influence performance on any of the tasks. It was concluded that the hypothesis was confirmed and that the failure to find acceleration of conservation performance was due to its advanced nature relative to the other problems and/or the tangential manner in which Montessori exercises deal with the critical concepts that underly it.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)356-368
Number of pages13
JournalContemporary Educational Psychology
Volume1
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1976
Externally publishedYes

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