Performance of Coupled Physics Solvers for Multidisciplinary Hypersonic Flow Simulations on Several Classes of Computer Architectures

David A. Kessler, Andrew Hess, Keith Obenschain, David C. Eder, Alice E. Koniges, Kevin Roe, David R. McDaniel, Ryan B. Bond, Eric J. Nielsen, Aaron Walden, Gabriel Nastac, Kevin Jacobson, Anthony Knutson, Graham Candler, Heath Johnson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The application of hypersonic flow simulation tools to realistic flight scenarios will require the coupling of multiple physical effects to the baseline fluid dynamics. Such multiphysics effects can include the aerooelastic response of the airframe or engine components, dynamic transport of atmospheric particles, the deformation of solid-fluid interfaces that can ablate, pyrolyze, or erode, as well as a host of other processes, all of which are governed by unique sets of physical equations and models. Coupling multiple (and potentially disparate) physics solvers to a robust compressible flow solver poses additional challenges related to the stability, performance and scalability of the combined solver. The choices made during the software design process can therefore lead to a variation in simulation efficiency across different computer architectures. In this paper, we will consider two representative multiphysics hypersonic flow scenarios: the interaction of solid particulates with the flow field created by a hypersonic lifting body and the aerooelastic deformation of a model airframe under high-Mach-number flow conditions. For these simulations we explore the behavior of several hypersonic simulation tools, including Kestrel, FUN3D, US3D, and the JENRER○ Multiphysics Framework, on several high performance computing systems containing various CPU and GPU architectures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAIAA SciTech Forum 2022
PublisherAmerican Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Inc, AIAA
ISBN (Print)9781624106316
DOIs
StatePublished - 2022
EventAIAA Science and Technology Forum and Exposition, AIAA SciTech Forum 2022 - San Diego, United States
Duration: Jan 3 2022Jan 7 2022

Publication series

NameAIAA Science and Technology Forum and Exposition, AIAA SciTech Forum 2022

Conference

ConferenceAIAA Science and Technology Forum and Exposition, AIAA SciTech Forum 2022
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CitySan Diego
Period1/3/221/7/22

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported in part by the DoD HPCMP, through Naval Sea System Command Award # N00024-19-D-6400, task order N00024-19-F-8814 and Air Force Research Labs Directed Energy Directorate Award # FA9451-20-D-0004, task order FA9451-20-F-0004, to the Maui High Performance Computing Center (MHPCC), which is operated by the University of Hawaii. Computing resources were provided by the DoD HPCMP. The NASA participants in this study would like to thank Bret Stanford from NASA Langley Research Center for generating the waverider structural model and acknowledge the support of the NASA Langley Research Center CIF/IRAD program and the NASA Transformational Tools and Technologies (TTT) Project of the Transformative Aeronautics Concepts Program under the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate. The University of Minnesota participants were sponsored by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) under grant # N00164-20-1-2004. The authors would also like to acknowledge Dr. Joel Bretheim and Dr. Spencer Starr for their assistance running the Kestrel solver and Dr. Roy Campbell for many useful discussions regarding the various computing architectures considered herein.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Inc. All rights reserved.

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