Perennial Grain and Oilseed Crops

Michael B. Kantar, Catrin Tyl, Kevin M. Dorn, Xiaofei Zhang, Jacob M Jungers, Joe M. Kaser, Rachel R. Schendel, James O Eckberg, Bryan C. Runck, Mirko Bunzel, Nicholas R Jordan, Robert M Stupar, M D Marks, James A Anderson, Gregg A Johnson, Craig C Sheaffer, Tonya C Schoenfuss, B. Pam Ismail, George E Heimpel, Donald L Wyse

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Historically, agroecosystems have been designed to produce food. Modern societies now demand more from food systems-not only food, fuel, and fiber, but also a variety of ecosystem services. And although today's farming practices are producing unprecedented yields, they are also contributing to ecosystem problems such as soil erosion, greenhouse gas emissions, and water pollution. This review highlights the potential benefits of perennial grains and oilseeds and discusses recent progress in their development. Because of perennials' extended growing season and deep root systems, they may require less fertilizer, help prevent runoff, and be more drought tolerant than annuals. Their production is expected to reduce tillage, which could positively affect biodiversity. End-use possibilities involve food, feed, fuel, and nonfood bioproducts. Fostering multidisciplinary collaborations will be essential for the successful integration of perennials into commercial cropping and food-processing systems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)703-729
Number of pages27
JournalAnnual Review of Plant Biology
Volume67
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 29 2016

Fingerprint

oilseed crops
grain crops
Food
biobased products
Ecosystem
oilseeds
water pollution
greenhouse gas emissions
agroecosystems
Water Pollution
food processing
ecosystem services
soil erosion
Food Handling
Foster Home Care
root systems
Droughts
tillage
Biodiversity
Fertilizers

Keywords

  • Domestication
  • Intermediate wheatgrass
  • Perennial food quality
  • Perennial management

Cite this

Perennial Grain and Oilseed Crops. / Kantar, Michael B.; Tyl, Catrin; Dorn, Kevin M.; Zhang, Xiaofei; Jungers, Jacob M; Kaser, Joe M.; Schendel, Rachel R.; Eckberg, James O; Runck, Bryan C.; Bunzel, Mirko; Jordan, Nicholas R; Stupar, Robert M; Marks, M D; Anderson, James A; Johnson, Gregg A; Sheaffer, Craig C; Schoenfuss, Tonya C; Ismail, B. Pam; Heimpel, George E; Wyse, Donald L.

In: Annual Review of Plant Biology, Vol. 67, 29.04.2016, p. 703-729.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Kantar, Michael B. ; Tyl, Catrin ; Dorn, Kevin M. ; Zhang, Xiaofei ; Jungers, Jacob M ; Kaser, Joe M. ; Schendel, Rachel R. ; Eckberg, James O ; Runck, Bryan C. ; Bunzel, Mirko ; Jordan, Nicholas R ; Stupar, Robert M ; Marks, M D ; Anderson, James A ; Johnson, Gregg A ; Sheaffer, Craig C ; Schoenfuss, Tonya C ; Ismail, B. Pam ; Heimpel, George E ; Wyse, Donald L. / Perennial Grain and Oilseed Crops. In: Annual Review of Plant Biology. 2016 ; Vol. 67. pp. 703-729.
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