Perceptual-motor sequence learning of general regularities and specific sequences

Chad J. Marsolek, Jason E. Field

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Participants viewed digit strings and typed them on a computer keyboard. When they used the same key configuration across training and test, they typed test strings that adhered to the same sequence rule as training strings faster than test strings that adhered to the opposite rule (general-regularity [GR] learning), and they typed test strings that were processed repeatedly during training faster than test strings that were not (specific-sequence [SS] learning). However when they used different key configurations at training and at test, GR learning, but not SS learning was observed. Conversely, when they did not type but spoke the strings aloud during training, SS learning, but not GR learning, was observed. Results suggest that in addition to declarative memory for specific sequences, relatively independent subsystems underlie procedural learning of perceptual-motor sequence components (producing GR effects) and sequence wholes (producing SS effects).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)815-836
Number of pages22
JournalJournal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1999

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