Perceptions of elder abuse and help-seeking patterns among african-american, caucasian american, and korean-american elderly women

Ailee Moon, Oliver Williams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

145 Scopus citations

Abstract

Thirteen scenarios were used to measure and compare the perceptions of elder abuse and help-seeking behaviors of african-american, caucasian american, and korean-american elderly women. significant group differences existed in their perceptions of elder abuse with regard to six scenarios, and the korean-american women were substantially less likely to perceive a given situation as abusive than the other groups. the three groups also showed significant differences in their intended use of formal and informal sources of help in the case of elder abuse.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)386-395
Number of pages10
JournalGerontologist
Volume33
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1993

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
1This research is supported by the College of Human Ecology Innovative Research Grant and the Graduate School Grants-in-Aid of the University of Minnesota. We thank Hae Kyung Choi, PhD, Mary Wappes, MSW, and Stephaney Johnson, MSW, for their assistance in data collection. 2Assistant professor, School of Social Welfare, University of California at Los Angeles, 247 Dodd Hall, 405 Hilgard Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90024. Assistant professor, School of Social Work, University of Minnesota at Minneapolis.

Keywords

  • Ethnic differences
  • Formal and informal help
  • Severity of elder abuse

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