Perceptions of a Healthier Neighborhood Food Environment Linked to Greater Fruit and Vegetable Purchases at Small and Non-Traditional Food Stores

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Abstract

The aim of this study was to examine associations between perceived neighborhood food environments and food purchasing at small and non-traditional food stores. Intercept interviews of 661 customers were conducted in 105 small and non-traditional food stores. We captured (1) customer perceptions of the neighborhood food environment, (2) associations between customer perceptions and store-level characteristics, and (3) customers’ perceptions and shopping behaviors. Findings suggest that customers with more favorable perceptions of the neighborhood food environment were more likely to purchase fruits and vegetables, despite no significant association between perceptions of the neighborhood and objectively measured store characteristics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)741-761
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Hunger and Environmental Nutrition
Volume14
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2 2019

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This research was supported by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases of the National Institutes of Health [M.N.L. grant number R01DK104348] and the Global Obesity Prevention Center (GOPC) at Johns Hopkins, which is supported by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and the Office of the Director, National Institutes of Health [M.N.L, grant number U54HD070725]. Support for Dr. Caspi was provided by the National Cancer Institute, Cancer Related Health Disparities Education and Career Development Program [grant number R25CA163184]. NIH grant UL1TR000114 from the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) supported data management. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health. Funding agencies had no role in the design, analysis or writing of this article; National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases [R01DK104348]. We would like to acknowledge the Minneapolis Health Department for their support and expertise working with local small food stores. We would also like to acknowledge the large data acquisition and data management team, most especially Stacey Moe, William Baker, and Pamela Carr-Manthe. Finally, we thank the participants of this study.

Keywords

  • Food environment
  • fruit
  • non-traditional stores
  • perceptions
  • purchasing
  • shopping behaviors
  • small food stores
  • vegetables

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