Perceptions of a Healthier Neighborhood Food Environment Linked to Greater Fruit and Vegetable Purchases at Small and Non-Traditional Food Stores

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The aim of this study was to examine associations between perceived neighborhood food environments and food purchasing at small and non-traditional food stores. Intercept interviews of 661 customers were conducted in 105 small and non-traditional food stores. We captured (1) customer perceptions of the neighborhood food environment, (2) associations between customer perceptions and store-level characteristics, and (3) customers’ perceptions and shopping behaviors. Findings suggest that customers with more favorable perceptions of the neighborhood food environment were more likely to purchase fruits and vegetables, despite no significant association between perceptions of the neighborhood and objectively measured store characteristics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Hunger and Environmental Nutrition
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

vegetables
Vegetables
purchase
Fruit
food
customer
Food
Interviews
interview

Keywords

  • Food environment
  • fruit
  • non-traditional stores
  • perceptions
  • purchasing
  • shopping behaviors
  • small food stores
  • vegetables

Cite this

@article{d0a94ea48edc4fe384638cca22e19f78,
title = "Perceptions of a Healthier Neighborhood Food Environment Linked to Greater Fruit and Vegetable Purchases at Small and Non-Traditional Food Stores",
abstract = "The aim of this study was to examine associations between perceived neighborhood food environments and food purchasing at small and non-traditional food stores. Intercept interviews of 661 customers were conducted in 105 small and non-traditional food stores. We captured (1) customer perceptions of the neighborhood food environment, (2) associations between customer perceptions and store-level characteristics, and (3) customers’ perceptions and shopping behaviors. Findings suggest that customers with more favorable perceptions of the neighborhood food environment were more likely to purchase fruits and vegetables, despite no significant association between perceptions of the neighborhood and objectively measured store characteristics.",
keywords = "Food environment, fruit, non-traditional stores, perceptions, purchasing, shopping behaviors, small food stores, vegetables",
author = "Barnes, {Timothy L} and Lenk, {Kathleen M} and Caspi, {Caitlin E} and Erickson, {Darin J} and Laska, {Melissa N}",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/19320248.2018.1549518",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Journal of Hunger and Environmental Nutrition",
issn = "1932-0248",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Perceptions of a Healthier Neighborhood Food Environment Linked to Greater Fruit and Vegetable Purchases at Small and Non-Traditional Food Stores

AU - Barnes, Timothy L

AU - Lenk, Kathleen M

AU - Caspi, Caitlin E

AU - Erickson, Darin J

AU - Laska, Melissa N

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - The aim of this study was to examine associations between perceived neighborhood food environments and food purchasing at small and non-traditional food stores. Intercept interviews of 661 customers were conducted in 105 small and non-traditional food stores. We captured (1) customer perceptions of the neighborhood food environment, (2) associations between customer perceptions and store-level characteristics, and (3) customers’ perceptions and shopping behaviors. Findings suggest that customers with more favorable perceptions of the neighborhood food environment were more likely to purchase fruits and vegetables, despite no significant association between perceptions of the neighborhood and objectively measured store characteristics.

AB - The aim of this study was to examine associations between perceived neighborhood food environments and food purchasing at small and non-traditional food stores. Intercept interviews of 661 customers were conducted in 105 small and non-traditional food stores. We captured (1) customer perceptions of the neighborhood food environment, (2) associations between customer perceptions and store-level characteristics, and (3) customers’ perceptions and shopping behaviors. Findings suggest that customers with more favorable perceptions of the neighborhood food environment were more likely to purchase fruits and vegetables, despite no significant association between perceptions of the neighborhood and objectively measured store characteristics.

KW - Food environment

KW - fruit

KW - non-traditional stores

KW - perceptions

KW - purchasing

KW - shopping behaviors

KW - small food stores

KW - vegetables

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85057326886&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85057326886&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/19320248.2018.1549518

DO - 10.1080/19320248.2018.1549518

M3 - Article

JO - Journal of Hunger and Environmental Nutrition

JF - Journal of Hunger and Environmental Nutrition

SN - 1932-0248

ER -