Perceived threat, immigration policy support, and media coverage: Hostile media and presumed influence

Brendan R. Watson, Daniel Riffe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study, using survey data (N = 529), examined perceived immigration "threat," subjective knowledge, support for punitive and assimilative immigration policies, and opinions about media coverage effects. Perceived threat was not related to a third-person effect; however, perceived threat of immigrants was related to support for punitive immigration policies, and a strong "hostile media perception" was confirmed. There was a significant belief among respondents that others would view immigration negatively, if only media were not biased in favor of immigration. Internet use, age, race, and education predicted threat perception; perceived threat, perceived favorableness of coverage, and daily newspaper reading predicted presumed influence of news coverage.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)459-479
Number of pages21
JournalInternational Journal of Public Opinion Research
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2013

Fingerprint

immigration policy
coverage
threat
immigration
newspaper
news
immigrant
Internet
human being
education

Cite this

Perceived threat, immigration policy support, and media coverage : Hostile media and presumed influence. / Watson, Brendan R.; Riffe, Daniel.

In: International Journal of Public Opinion Research, Vol. 25, No. 4, 01.12.2013, p. 459-479.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{44bff10b3f054fcf916998dbe9253380,
title = "Perceived threat, immigration policy support, and media coverage: Hostile media and presumed influence",
abstract = "This study, using survey data (N = 529), examined perceived immigration {"}threat,{"} subjective knowledge, support for punitive and assimilative immigration policies, and opinions about media coverage effects. Perceived threat was not related to a third-person effect; however, perceived threat of immigrants was related to support for punitive immigration policies, and a strong {"}hostile media perception{"} was confirmed. There was a significant belief among respondents that others would view immigration negatively, if only media were not biased in favor of immigration. Internet use, age, race, and education predicted threat perception; perceived threat, perceived favorableness of coverage, and daily newspaper reading predicted presumed influence of news coverage.",
author = "Watson, {Brendan R.} and Daniel Riffe",
year = "2013",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1093/ijpor/eds032",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "25",
pages = "459--479",
journal = "International Journal of Public Opinion Research",
issn = "0954-2892",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Perceived threat, immigration policy support, and media coverage

T2 - Hostile media and presumed influence

AU - Watson, Brendan R.

AU - Riffe, Daniel

PY - 2013/12/1

Y1 - 2013/12/1

N2 - This study, using survey data (N = 529), examined perceived immigration "threat," subjective knowledge, support for punitive and assimilative immigration policies, and opinions about media coverage effects. Perceived threat was not related to a third-person effect; however, perceived threat of immigrants was related to support for punitive immigration policies, and a strong "hostile media perception" was confirmed. There was a significant belief among respondents that others would view immigration negatively, if only media were not biased in favor of immigration. Internet use, age, race, and education predicted threat perception; perceived threat, perceived favorableness of coverage, and daily newspaper reading predicted presumed influence of news coverage.

AB - This study, using survey data (N = 529), examined perceived immigration "threat," subjective knowledge, support for punitive and assimilative immigration policies, and opinions about media coverage effects. Perceived threat was not related to a third-person effect; however, perceived threat of immigrants was related to support for punitive immigration policies, and a strong "hostile media perception" was confirmed. There was a significant belief among respondents that others would view immigration negatively, if only media were not biased in favor of immigration. Internet use, age, race, and education predicted threat perception; perceived threat, perceived favorableness of coverage, and daily newspaper reading predicted presumed influence of news coverage.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84890222007&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84890222007&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1093/ijpor/eds032

DO - 10.1093/ijpor/eds032

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84890222007

VL - 25

SP - 459

EP - 479

JO - International Journal of Public Opinion Research

JF - International Journal of Public Opinion Research

SN - 0954-2892

IS - 4

ER -