Perceived control over traumatic events: Is it always adaptive?

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

This chapter provides an overview of my research programme on the relations between perceived control and adjustment to traumatic events, including victimisation. I will begin with a review of some early research on attributions and then describe a new model of perceived control and the development of a new measure of perceived control. I will then review some findings regarding whether the relations between control and adjustment differ as a function of characteristics of the person or event. Finally, I will describe an online intervention we are developing that is designed to increase perceived control over stressful and traumatic events.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationJustice for Victims
Subtitle of host publicationPerspectives on Rights, Transition and Reconciliation
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages265-276
Number of pages12
ISBN (Electronic)9781136207754
ISBN (Print)9780415634335
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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