Pentatomidae (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Pentatomidae) captured on purple prism traps deployed for detection of emerald ash borer (agrilus planipennis) (copeoptera: Buprestidae) in minnesota

Daniela T. Pezzini, Mitch Haag, James Walker, Mark Abrahamson, Robert L. Koch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

The observation of bycatch from insect trapping programs, though often considered bothersome, may hold value for ecological and taxonomic studies. In Minnesota, a large trapping survey consisting of pheromone-baited purple prism traps, has been conducted for early detection of Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae). Stink bugs (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae), which are pests of increasing importance in the North Central U.S., were observed to be captured by these traps. The objective of this study was to use trap bycatch from the A. planipennis traps for further documentation of the abundance and diversity of Pentatomidae in Minnesota. In 2011 and 2012, 4,401 and 5,651 purple prism traps, respectively, were deployed and checked in Minnesota. Across both years, a total of 17 species of Pentatomidae were identified from 2 subfamilies, Asopinae and Pentatominae. The most abundant and prevalent species collected were Banasa calva (Say), B. dimidiata (Say), Chinavia hilaris (Say), Euschistus tristigmus luridus Dallas, Menecles insertus (Say), and Podisus maculiventris (Say). The pentatomid community observed on purple prism traps deployed in arboreal habitats differed from pentatomid communities reported in Minnesota crops (i.e., soybean, wheat and corn). Results of this study show that many pentatomid species are captured on purple prism traps and therefore bycatch of these traps could provide valuable information on the pentatomid community. However, purple prism traps should be used in addition to traditional surveillance or scouting methods for pentatomids.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number3
Pages (from-to)10-17
Number of pages8
JournalGreat Lakes Entomologist
Volume51
Issue number1-2
StatePublished - Mar 1 2018

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Daniela T. Pezzini(1), Mitch Haag(2), James Walker(1), Mark Abrahamson(3) and Robert L. Koch(1,4) 1Department of Entomology, University of Minnesota, 1980 Folwell Avenue, Saint Paul, MN 55108 2Three River Parks District, 3000 Xenium Lane North, Plymouth, MN 55441 3Minnesota Department of Agriculture, 625 Robert Street North, Saint Paul, MN 55155 4 Corresponding author: koch0125@umn.edu Acknowledgements We are grateful to Tiffany Pahs and the field staff of the Minnesota Department of Agriculture for assistance collecting field data and to Hailey Shanovich and three anonymous reviewers for providing review on earlier versions on this work. This project was based on the bycatch of A. planipennis surveys funded by the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

Funding Information:
We are grateful to Tiffany Pahs and the field staff of the Minnesota Department of Agriculture for assistance collecting field data and to Hailey Shanovich and three anonymous reviewers for providing review of earlier versions on this work. This project was based on the bycatch of A. planipennis surveys funded by the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2018, Michigan Entomological Society. All rights reserved.

Copyright:
Copyright 2020 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • Agrilus planipennis
  • Bycatch
  • Invasive species
  • Purple prism traps
  • Stink bugs

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Pentatomidae (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Pentatomidae) captured on purple prism traps deployed for detection of emerald ash borer (agrilus planipennis) (copeoptera: Buprestidae) in minnesota'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this