Peers, Predators, and Porn: Predicting Parental Underestimation of Children's Risky Online Experiences

Sahara Byrne, Sherri Jean Katz, Theodore Lee, Daniel Linz, Mary Mcilrath

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Scopus citations

Abstract

Parents often underestimate the degree to which their children engage in risky online activities such as cyberbullying, worrisome interactions with strangers, and exposure to sexual content. This study attempts to identify the underlying predictors of such parental misconceptions. A national sample survey (nonrandom) of 456 matched parent-child pairs revealed that a permissive parenting style, difficulty communicating about online risks, and household environmental variables such as having access to a private computing space play a role in parental underestimation of risky social interactions that their children encounter and experience online. Implications for scholars and caregivers are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)215-231
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Computer-Mediated Communication
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Keywords

  • Cyberbullying
  • Family Communication
  • Internet
  • Parents
  • Risk
  • Sexual Content
  • Youth

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