Pediatric trauma care in low resource settings: Challenges, opportunities, and solutions

Andrew W. Kiragu, Stephen J. Dunlop, Njoki Mwarumba, Sanusi Gidado, Adesope Adesina, Michael Mwachiro, Daniel A. Gbadero, Tina M. Slusher

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Trauma constitutes a significant cause of death and disability globally. The vast majority -about 95%, of the 5.8 million deaths each year, occur in low-and-middle-income countries (LMICs) 3-6. This includes almost 1 million children. The resource-adapted introduction of trauma care protocols, regionalized care and the growth specialized centers for trauma care within each LMIC are key to improved outcomes and the lowering of trauma-related morbidity and mortality globally. Resource limitations in LMICs make it necessary to develop injury prevention strategies and optimize the use of locally available resources when injury prevention measures fail. This will lead to the achievement of the best possible outcomes for critically ill and injured children. A commitment by the governments in LMICs working alone or in collaboration with international non-governmental organizations (NGOs) to provide adequate healthcare to their citizens is also crucial to improved survival after major trauma. The increase in global conflicts also has significantly deleterious effects on children, and governments and international organizations like the United Nations have a significant role to play in reducing these. This review details the evaluation and management of traumatic injuries in pediatric patients and gives some recommendations for improvements to trauma care in LMICs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number155
JournalFrontiers in Pediatrics
Volume6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

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Pediatrics
Wounds and Injuries
Organizations
United Nations
Trauma Centers
Critical Illness
Cause of Death
Morbidity
Delivery of Health Care
Survival
Mortality
Growth

Keywords

  • Child abuse
  • Disasters
  • Emergency management
  • Injury prevention
  • Low- and middle-income countries
  • Pediatrics
  • Surgical management
  • Trauma

Cite this

Pediatric trauma care in low resource settings : Challenges, opportunities, and solutions. / Kiragu, Andrew W.; Dunlop, Stephen J.; Mwarumba, Njoki; Gidado, Sanusi; Adesina, Adesope; Mwachiro, Michael; Gbadero, Daniel A.; Slusher, Tina M.

In: Frontiers in Pediatrics, Vol. 6, 155, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Kiragu, AW, Dunlop, SJ, Mwarumba, N, Gidado, S, Adesina, A, Mwachiro, M, Gbadero, DA & Slusher, TM 2018, 'Pediatric trauma care in low resource settings: Challenges, opportunities, and solutions', Frontiers in Pediatrics, vol. 6, 155. https://doi.org/10.3389/fped.2018.00155
Kiragu, Andrew W. ; Dunlop, Stephen J. ; Mwarumba, Njoki ; Gidado, Sanusi ; Adesina, Adesope ; Mwachiro, Michael ; Gbadero, Daniel A. ; Slusher, Tina M. / Pediatric trauma care in low resource settings : Challenges, opportunities, and solutions. In: Frontiers in Pediatrics. 2018 ; Vol. 6.
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