Pedagogy, accountability, and perceptions of quality by type of higher education in Egypt and Jordan

Ragui Assaad, Eslam Badawy, Caroline Krafft

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    2 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    A number of reasons have been proposed for the poor quality of higher education in the Arab world, including the poor incentive structures of public higher education institutions. The expansion of private higher education has been hailed as an important part of enhancing incentives and thus improving education quality. However, it is not clear whether the practices of private higher education institutions differ from those of public institutions. This article explores whether private provision improves the quality of higher education, as measured by pedagogy, accountability, and student perceptions of quality. The analysis focuses on commerce and information technology programs in Egypt and Jordan. The results indicate that pedagogy, accountability, and student perceptions of quality do not vary systematically by type of higher education institution in these countries and that expanding the role of private institutions in higher education is therefore unlikely to automatically improve educational processes or quality.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)746-775
    Number of pages30
    JournalComparative Education Review
    Volume60
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Nov 1 2016

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    information technology

    Cite this

    Pedagogy, accountability, and perceptions of quality by type of higher education in Egypt and Jordan. / Assaad, Ragui; Badawy, Eslam; Krafft, Caroline.

    In: Comparative Education Review, Vol. 60, No. 4, 01.11.2016, p. 746-775.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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