Peak lung function during young adulthood and future long-term blood pressure variability: The Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study

Yacob G. Tedla, Yuichiro Yano, Bharat Thyagarajan, Ravi Kalhan, Anthony J. Viera, Sharon Rosenberg, Philip Greenland, Mercedes R. Carnethon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background and aims: Long-term blood pressure variability (BPV) is associated with cardiovascular events independent of mean blood pressure (BP); however, little is known about its predictors. Methods: Using data from the CARDIA study, we investigated the association between peak lung-function and long-term BPV in 2917 individuals (mean age 24.8 years, 45.3% males, 58.6% whites) who were not taking antihypertensive medications. Lung-function was measured using forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1-s (FEV1) at years 0, 2, 5, 10 and 20 and the maximum score attained was considered as peak lung-function. Variability independent of the mean (VIM) and coefficient of variation (CV) of BP were calculated to quantify BPV since achieving peak lung-function across 9 visits over 30 years. Results: In a multivariate linear regression models, individuals in the 2nd (−0.64 mmHg; 95% CI: −1.06, −0.19), 3rd (−0.96; −1.47, −0.45), and 4th (−0.85: −1.53, −0.17) quartiles of FVC had lower VIM of systolic BP than the those in quartile 1 (p-trend = 0.005). CV of systolic BP was also lower by −0.58 (−0.98, −0.19), −0.92 (−1.42, −0.43), and −0.74 (−1.40, −0.08) percentage points, in the three progressively higher quartiles of FVC compared to quartile 1 (p-trend = 0.008). Similar findings were observed when the outcome was diastolic BPV. There was no association of FEV1 and FEV1-to-FVC ratio with BPV. Conclusions: These findings suggest that smaller lung volume or restrictive lung disease during young adulthood, which result in lower peak FVC, may independently increase the risk of higher long-term BPV during middle adulthood.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)225-231
Number of pages7
JournalAtherosclerosis
Volume275
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2018

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study is conducted and supported by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) in collaboration with the University of Alabama at Birmingham ( HHSN268201300025C and HHSN268201300026C ), Northwestern University ( HHSN268201300027C ), University of Minnesota ( HHSN268201300028C ), Kaiser Foundation Research Institute ( HHSN268201300029C ), and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine ( HHSN268200900041C ). CARDIA is also partially supported by the Intramural Research Program of the National Institute on Aging (NIA) and intra-agency agreement AG0005 between the NIA and NHLBI. Y.G. Tedla was supported by a T32 HL 069771 Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute to the Northwestern University, Department of Preventive Medicine. Y. Yano was supported by the American Heart Association Strategically Focused Research Network Fellow Grant to the Northwestern University, Department of Preventive Medicine.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2018

Keywords

  • Long-term blood pressure variability
  • Lung function
  • Pressure variability
  • Visit-to-visit blood

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