Patterns of change in implementation of state alcohol control policies in the United States, 1999-2011

Toben F. Nelson, Ziming Xuan, Jason G. Blanchette, Timothy C. Heeren, Timothy S. Naimi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims: To examine state alcohol control policy implementation by policy efficacy and intent. Design: A descriptive longitudinal analysis of policy implementation. Setting: The United States, 1999-2011. Participants: Fifty states and the District of Columbia. Measurements: Twenty-nine state-level policies were rated based on an implementation rating (IR; range=0.0-1.0) gathered from the Alcohol Policy Information System, government and industry reports and other sources; and expert judgment about policy efficacy for addressing binge drinking and alcohol-impaired driving among the general population and youth, respectively. Findings: On average, implementation of the most effective general population policies did not change [mean IR=0.366 in 1999; 0.375 in 2011; slope for annual change=0.001; 95% confidence interval (CI) for the slope -0.001, 0.002]. In contrast, implementation increased over time for less effective policies (mean IR=0.287 in 1999; 0.427 in 2011; slope for annual change compared with most effective policies=0.009; slope 95% CI=0.002-0.007), for youth-oriented policies (mean IR=0.424 in 1999; 0.511 in 2011; slope for annual change compared with most effective policies=0.007; slope 95% CI=0.005-0.009), and for impaired driving policies (mean IR=0.493 in 1999; 0.608 in 2011; slope for annual change compared with most effective policies=0.0105; slope 95% CI=0.007-0.014). Conclusions: Implementation of politically palatable state alcohol policies, such as those targeting youth and alcohol-impaired driving, and less effective policies increased during 1999-2011 in the United States, while the most effective policies that may maximally protect public health remained underused.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)59-68
Number of pages10
JournalAddiction
Volume110
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Alcohols
Confidence Intervals
Binge Drinking
Policy Making
Public Policy
Information Systems
Industry
Public Health

Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • Legislation
  • Policy
  • Public health

Cite this

Patterns of change in implementation of state alcohol control policies in the United States, 1999-2011. / Nelson, Toben F.; Xuan, Ziming; Blanchette, Jason G.; Heeren, Timothy C.; Naimi, Timothy S.

In: Addiction, Vol. 110, No. 1, 01.01.2015, p. 59-68.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nelson, Toben F. ; Xuan, Ziming ; Blanchette, Jason G. ; Heeren, Timothy C. ; Naimi, Timothy S. / Patterns of change in implementation of state alcohol control policies in the United States, 1999-2011. In: Addiction. 2015 ; Vol. 110, No. 1. pp. 59-68.
@article{7c71deae62af454d8a0abab2a5c81465,
title = "Patterns of change in implementation of state alcohol control policies in the United States, 1999-2011",
abstract = "Aims: To examine state alcohol control policy implementation by policy efficacy and intent. Design: A descriptive longitudinal analysis of policy implementation. Setting: The United States, 1999-2011. Participants: Fifty states and the District of Columbia. Measurements: Twenty-nine state-level policies were rated based on an implementation rating (IR; range=0.0-1.0) gathered from the Alcohol Policy Information System, government and industry reports and other sources; and expert judgment about policy efficacy for addressing binge drinking and alcohol-impaired driving among the general population and youth, respectively. Findings: On average, implementation of the most effective general population policies did not change [mean IR=0.366 in 1999; 0.375 in 2011; slope for annual change=0.001; 95{\%} confidence interval (CI) for the slope -0.001, 0.002]. In contrast, implementation increased over time for less effective policies (mean IR=0.287 in 1999; 0.427 in 2011; slope for annual change compared with most effective policies=0.009; slope 95{\%} CI=0.002-0.007), for youth-oriented policies (mean IR=0.424 in 1999; 0.511 in 2011; slope for annual change compared with most effective policies=0.007; slope 95{\%} CI=0.005-0.009), and for impaired driving policies (mean IR=0.493 in 1999; 0.608 in 2011; slope for annual change compared with most effective policies=0.0105; slope 95{\%} CI=0.007-0.014). Conclusions: Implementation of politically palatable state alcohol policies, such as those targeting youth and alcohol-impaired driving, and less effective policies increased during 1999-2011 in the United States, while the most effective policies that may maximally protect public health remained underused.",
keywords = "Alcohol, Legislation, Policy, Public health",
author = "Nelson, {Toben F.} and Ziming Xuan and Blanchette, {Jason G.} and Heeren, {Timothy C.} and Naimi, {Timothy S.}",
year = "2015",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/add.12706",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "110",
pages = "59--68",
journal = "Addiction",
issn = "0965-2140",
publisher = "Blackwell Publishing Ltd",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Patterns of change in implementation of state alcohol control policies in the United States, 1999-2011

AU - Nelson, Toben F.

AU - Xuan, Ziming

AU - Blanchette, Jason G.

AU - Heeren, Timothy C.

AU - Naimi, Timothy S.

PY - 2015/1/1

Y1 - 2015/1/1

N2 - Aims: To examine state alcohol control policy implementation by policy efficacy and intent. Design: A descriptive longitudinal analysis of policy implementation. Setting: The United States, 1999-2011. Participants: Fifty states and the District of Columbia. Measurements: Twenty-nine state-level policies were rated based on an implementation rating (IR; range=0.0-1.0) gathered from the Alcohol Policy Information System, government and industry reports and other sources; and expert judgment about policy efficacy for addressing binge drinking and alcohol-impaired driving among the general population and youth, respectively. Findings: On average, implementation of the most effective general population policies did not change [mean IR=0.366 in 1999; 0.375 in 2011; slope for annual change=0.001; 95% confidence interval (CI) for the slope -0.001, 0.002]. In contrast, implementation increased over time for less effective policies (mean IR=0.287 in 1999; 0.427 in 2011; slope for annual change compared with most effective policies=0.009; slope 95% CI=0.002-0.007), for youth-oriented policies (mean IR=0.424 in 1999; 0.511 in 2011; slope for annual change compared with most effective policies=0.007; slope 95% CI=0.005-0.009), and for impaired driving policies (mean IR=0.493 in 1999; 0.608 in 2011; slope for annual change compared with most effective policies=0.0105; slope 95% CI=0.007-0.014). Conclusions: Implementation of politically palatable state alcohol policies, such as those targeting youth and alcohol-impaired driving, and less effective policies increased during 1999-2011 in the United States, while the most effective policies that may maximally protect public health remained underused.

AB - Aims: To examine state alcohol control policy implementation by policy efficacy and intent. Design: A descriptive longitudinal analysis of policy implementation. Setting: The United States, 1999-2011. Participants: Fifty states and the District of Columbia. Measurements: Twenty-nine state-level policies were rated based on an implementation rating (IR; range=0.0-1.0) gathered from the Alcohol Policy Information System, government and industry reports and other sources; and expert judgment about policy efficacy for addressing binge drinking and alcohol-impaired driving among the general population and youth, respectively. Findings: On average, implementation of the most effective general population policies did not change [mean IR=0.366 in 1999; 0.375 in 2011; slope for annual change=0.001; 95% confidence interval (CI) for the slope -0.001, 0.002]. In contrast, implementation increased over time for less effective policies (mean IR=0.287 in 1999; 0.427 in 2011; slope for annual change compared with most effective policies=0.009; slope 95% CI=0.002-0.007), for youth-oriented policies (mean IR=0.424 in 1999; 0.511 in 2011; slope for annual change compared with most effective policies=0.007; slope 95% CI=0.005-0.009), and for impaired driving policies (mean IR=0.493 in 1999; 0.608 in 2011; slope for annual change compared with most effective policies=0.0105; slope 95% CI=0.007-0.014). Conclusions: Implementation of politically palatable state alcohol policies, such as those targeting youth and alcohol-impaired driving, and less effective policies increased during 1999-2011 in the United States, while the most effective policies that may maximally protect public health remained underused.

KW - Alcohol

KW - Legislation

KW - Policy

KW - Public health

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84923197449&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84923197449&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/add.12706

DO - 10.1111/add.12706

M3 - Article

C2 - 25138287

AN - SCOPUS:84923197449

VL - 110

SP - 59

EP - 68

JO - Addiction

JF - Addiction

SN - 0965-2140

IS - 1

ER -