Patterns and Temporal Changes in Peer Affiliation among Aggressive and Nonaggressive Children Participating in a Summer School Program

Joel M. Hektner, Gerald J. August, George M. Realmuto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Scopus citations

Abstract

Examined the behavior and affiliation patterns of 118 highly, moderately, and nonaggressive 7-year-old children over the course of a 6-week summer school program. During free play, participants did not selectively associate on the basis of behavioral similarity, but initial mutual friendship choices did show a preference for similarly behaved peers. Nonreciprocated friendships at the beginning and end of the program and mutual friendships at the end revealed a preference of all children to befriend nonaggressive peers. Moderately aggressive children increased their number of mutual friendships and their association with nonaggressive peers during free play, whereas highly aggressive children lost mutual friends. The aggressiveness of a child's playmates predicted the likelihood of that child behaving inappropriately during free play. Results suggest that selective affiliation may be the result of peer rejection rather than an active process of seeking similarly aggressive peers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)603-614
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology
Volume29
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Patterns and Temporal Changes in Peer Affiliation among Aggressive and Nonaggressive Children Participating in a Summer School Program'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this