Pattern and Paradox in Parasite Reproduction

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    22 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Parasites are more fecund than free-living relatives. The traditional explanation of this is that parasites have to compensate for massive mortality in the transmission phase of their life cycles, but there are neo-Darwinian problems with this interpretation. Similarly, parasites invest more resources in reproduction than free-living relatives but often live longer as adults, and yet negative correlations are expected between fecundity and longevity. These patterns and paradoxes are discussed within the context of a general life-cycle theory. The theory is also used to address questions concerning the influence of age-specific mortality on life-cycle patterns, the trade-off between gamete size and numbers, and the relative merits of gametic and non-gametic reproduction. Wherever possible, the theory is related to facts about parasites.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)197-207
    Number of pages11
    JournalParasitology
    Volume86
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jan 1 1983

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    Reproduction
    Parasites
    Life Cycle Stages
    parasites
    life cycle (organisms)
    Mortality
    Germ Cells
    Fertility
    germ cells
    fecundity

    Cite this

    Pattern and Paradox in Parasite Reproduction. / Calow, P.

    In: Parasitology, Vol. 86, No. 4, 01.01.1983, p. 197-207.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Calow, P. / Pattern and Paradox in Parasite Reproduction. In: Parasitology. 1983 ; Vol. 86, No. 4. pp. 197-207.
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