Patients, pathogens, and protective immunity: The relevance of virus-induced alloreactivity in transplantation

Brent Koehn, Shivaprakash Gangappa, Joeseph D. Miller, Rafi Ahmed, Christian P. Larsen

Research output: Contribution to journalShort surveypeer-review

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

Successful transplantation requires the establishment of an ongoing state in which there is simultaneous inhibition of the undesired T cell-dependent rejection response and yet retention of the ability to develop effective cell-mediated primary and memory responses to pathogens. The complexity of attaining such a precarious state is underscored by the growing body of evidence that alloreactivity can be profoundly influenced by infections that occur before, concurrent with, or subsequent to an organ transplant. In this review, we explore the growing list of mechanisms that have been identified by which pathogen-host interactions might influence rejection, including the degeneracy of TCR recognition leading to cross-reactive immune responses, the effects of pathogens on innate immune mechanisms, and the potential impact of virally induced lymphopenia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2691-2696
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Immunology
Volume176
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2006

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Patients, pathogens, and protective immunity: The relevance of virus-induced alloreactivity in transplantation'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this