Patient Risk Factors Associated with Reported Urinary Quality of Life Following Artificial Urinary Sphincter Placement: A Paired Pre and Postoperative Analysis

Rachel A. Moses, Joshua A. Broghammer, Benjamin N. Breyer, Bryan B. Voelzke, Jill C. Buckley, Brad A. Erickson, Sean Elliott, Alex J. Vanni, Niveditta Ramkumar, Jeremy B. Myers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate potential associations between patient risk factors and incontinence related patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) preandpost artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) implantation. We hypothesize patient risk factors, including prior radiation and diabetes will have a negative association with post AUS PROMs. Methods: A review of prospectively collected preandpostoperative Incontinence Symptom Index [ISI] and Incontinence Impact Questionnaire-7 (IIQ-7)s from multiple institutions in the Trauma and Urologic Reconstruction Network of Surgeons was performed. Changes in preandpost AUS ISI and IIQ-7 scores were compared for the entire cohort then stratified by patients with prior AUS, obesity, diabetes, prior radiation, and mixed urinary incontinence. Results: A total of 145 patients, 67.2 (SD 10.9) years had complete preandpost AUS questionnaires (median follow up 186 days, IQR 136-362). Post AUS ISI and IIQ-7 scores improved significantly for the group at large. Prior radiation was associated with less improvement in total IIQ-7 scores, -25.5 (31.9) vs -39 (33.0), P = .03. Obesity was associated with a greater reduction in incontinence severity -13.6 (SD 9.1) vs -9.2 (SD 8.9), P<0.01, urge -5.2(SD 4.2) vs -2.5(SD 4.5), P <.01, and total ISI score -29.7(SD19.7) vs -21.2 (SD 19.9), P = .02. Prior AUS, diabetes, and mixed incontinence were not associated with post AUS PROMs outcome. Conclusion: Overall, patients reported a significant reduction in incontinence severity, bother, impact, and distress following AUS placement. Prior radiation was associated with less improvement in total IIQ-7 scores. In contrast, obesity demonstrated a greater reduction in ISI severity and urge scores compared to non-obese patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)226-232
Number of pages7
JournalUrology
Volume169
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2022

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© 2022 Elsevier Inc.

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