Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act Medicaid expansion and gains in health insurance coverage and access among cancer survivors

Sayeh S. Nikpay, Margaret G. Tebbs, Emily H. Castellanos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act extends Medicaid coverage to millions of low-income adults, including many survivors of cancer who were unable to purchase affordable health insurance coverage in the individual health insurance market. METHODS: Using data from the 2011 to 2015 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, the authors compared changes in coverage and health care access measures for low-income cancer survivors in states that did and did not expand Medicaid. RESULTS: The study population of 17,381 individuals included adults aged 18 to 64 years, and was predominantly female, white, and unmarried. The authors found a relative reduction in the uninsured rate of 11.7 percentage points and a relative increase in the probability of having a personal physician of 5.8 percentage points. Stratifying by whether states expanded Medicaid by 2015, the authors found that relative gains in coverage and access were larger among those individuals residing in states with expanded Medicaid compared with those residing in nonexpansion states. CONCLUSIONS: The results of the current study suggest that the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act Medicaid expansion has improved coverage and access for cancer survivors. Cancer 2018;124:2645-52.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2645-2652
Number of pages8
JournalCancer
Volume124
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 15 2018

Keywords

  • Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System
  • Medicaid
  • Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act
  • access
  • cancer survivor
  • insurance
  • low-income

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