Pathways to resilient functioning in maltreated children from single-level to multilevel investigations: From single-level to multilevel investigations

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Although groups of maltreated children differ from groups of nonmaltreated children on most of the neurobiological and psychological domains investigated thus far, not all individual maltreated children are affected by their experiences in the same manner. Moreover, the neurobiological and psychological functioning of some maltreated children appears not to be negatively affected, or it may reflect an enhanced neural plasticity in resilient individuals (Cicchetti & Curtis, 2006). We do not know whether the biological difficulties exhibited by many maltreated children are permanent or irreversible, or, if reversible, at what point in ontogeny or to what degree.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMinnesota Symposia on Child Psychology
Subtitle of host publicationThe Origins and Organization of Adaptation and Maladaptation
PublisherWiley Blackwell
Pages423-459
Number of pages37
ISBN (Electronic)9781118036600
ISBN (Print)9780470422731
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 4 2011

Publication series

NameMinnesota Symposia on Child Psychology Series
Volume36
ISSN (Print)0076-9266

Keywords

  • Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA)
  • Electroencephalogram (eeg)
  • MPCLS
  • Maltreated
  • Resilient

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Pathways to resilient functioning in maltreated children from single-level to multilevel investigations: From single-level to multilevel investigations'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Cicchetti, D. (2011). Pathways to resilient functioning in maltreated children from single-level to multilevel investigations: From single-level to multilevel investigations. In Minnesota Symposia on Child Psychology: The Origins and Organization of Adaptation and Maladaptation (pp. 423-459). (Minnesota Symposia on Child Psychology Series; Vol. 36). Wiley Blackwell. https://doi.org/10.1002/9781118036600.ch11