Pathogenesis of Acute Canine Gastric Dilatation-Volvulus Syndrome: Is There a Unifying Hypothesis?

Daniel J. Brockman, David E. Holt, Robert J. Washabau

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A single etiologic agent in the pathogenesis of acute canine gastric dilatation-volvulus (GDV) has not yet been identified. Several extrinsic physical and environmental risk factors have been identified, and many more intrinsic anatomic or pathologic risk factors are suspected. Many of the proposed intrinsic factors currently lack scientific evidence, and it may be impossible to substantiate these factors. Normal eructation, vomiting, or pyloric outflow mechanisms appear to fail when gastric dilation occurs. Whether volvulus consistently precedes or follows dilation is unclear. This paper explores the known risk factors for GDV and proposes a hypothesis to explain its pathogenesis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1108-1114
Number of pages7
JournalCompendium on Continuing Education for the Practicing Veterinarian
Volume22
Issue number12
StatePublished - Dec 1 2000

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Gastric Dilatation
Stomach Volvulus
volvulus
Canidae
stomach
risk factors
pathogenesis
dogs
Eructation
Intestinal Volvulus
Intrinsic Factor
vomiting
Vomiting
Dilatation
lack
evidence

Cite this

Pathogenesis of Acute Canine Gastric Dilatation-Volvulus Syndrome : Is There a Unifying Hypothesis? / Brockman, Daniel J.; Holt, David E.; Washabau, Robert J.

In: Compendium on Continuing Education for the Practicing Veterinarian, Vol. 22, No. 12, 01.12.2000, p. 1108-1114.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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