Particle dispersion and mass transfer in turbulent shear flows

Sean C. Garrick, Michael Bühlmann

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

DNS of condensation mass transfer in particle-laden incompressible turbulent mixing layers are performed. The flows are comprised of a particle-free condensable vapor mixing with micron-size porous particles. Simulations are performed at a single Reynolds number while varying the particle Stokes number, the mass transfer and convective time scales, and the vapor concentration at the particle surface. Convection-enhanced mass transfer and the surface concentration at the gas/particle interface are of great importance in accurately predicting gas–particle mass transfer rates. Particle slip velocities are varied by considering different particle Stokes numbers. Simulations utilizing the “perfect sink” assumption are compared with simulations in which the non-zero, steady-state surface concentration is calculated taking into account the sorption properties of porous particles. Results indicate that particle dispersion is greater at lower particle Stokes numbers. However the increased particle slip velocity in the higher particle Stokes number flows result in increased condensation. Furthermore, results show that the perfect sink assumption leads to an overprediction in the condensation mass transfer rate.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationSpringerBriefs in Applied Sciences and Technology
PublisherSpringer Verlag
Pages17-35
Number of pages19
Edition9783319595832
DOIs
StatePublished - 2018

Publication series

NameSpringerBriefs in Applied Sciences and Technology
Number9783319595832
ISSN (Print)2191-530X
ISSN (Electronic)2191-5318

Fingerprint

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Particle Size
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Acetyl-CoA Hydrolase
Acyl Carrier Protein
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Vapors
Stokes
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Sulfonium Compounds
Shear flow
Acetates
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Sorption

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Mathematics(all)
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Energy Engineering and Power Technology
  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Garrick, S. C., & Bühlmann, M. (2018). Particle dispersion and mass transfer in turbulent shear flows. In SpringerBriefs in Applied Sciences and Technology (9783319595832 ed., pp. 17-35). (SpringerBriefs in Applied Sciences and Technology; No. 9783319595832). Springer Verlag. DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-59584-9_2

Particle dispersion and mass transfer in turbulent shear flows. / Garrick, Sean C.; Bühlmann, Michael.

SpringerBriefs in Applied Sciences and Technology. 9783319595832. ed. Springer Verlag, 2018. p. 17-35 (SpringerBriefs in Applied Sciences and Technology; No. 9783319595832).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Garrick, SC & Bühlmann, M 2018, Particle dispersion and mass transfer in turbulent shear flows. in SpringerBriefs in Applied Sciences and Technology. 9783319595832 edn, SpringerBriefs in Applied Sciences and Technology, no. 9783319595832, Springer Verlag, pp. 17-35. DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-59584-9_2
Garrick SC, Bühlmann M. Particle dispersion and mass transfer in turbulent shear flows. In SpringerBriefs in Applied Sciences and Technology. 9783319595832 ed. Springer Verlag. 2018. p. 17-35. (SpringerBriefs in Applied Sciences and Technology; 9783319595832). Available from, DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-59584-9_2

Garrick, Sean C.; Bühlmann, Michael / Particle dispersion and mass transfer in turbulent shear flows.

SpringerBriefs in Applied Sciences and Technology. 9783319595832. ed. Springer Verlag, 2018. p. 17-35 (SpringerBriefs in Applied Sciences and Technology; No. 9783319595832).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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