Park-Use Behavior and Perceptions by Race, Hispanic Origin, and Immigrant Status in Minneapolis, MN: Implications on Park Strategies for Addressing Health Disparities

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

The study examines the connections between minority status, park use behavior, and park-related perceptions using recent survey data from three low-income neighborhoods in Minneapolis, MN. Blacks and foreign-born residents are found to underutilize parks. Blacks, Asians, and American Indians perceive fewer health benefits of parks than whites, including the benefits of parks for providing exercise/relaxation opportunities and family gathering spaces. Foreign-born residents, blacks, and Hispanics perceive greater and unique barriers to park use in terms of not feeling welcome, cultural and language restrictions, program schedule and pricing concerns, and/or facility maintenance and mismatch concerns. When designing park strategies for addressing health disparities, we recommend to focus the efforts on increasing awareness of park-related health benefits and removing specific park use barriers among minority and foreign-born communities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)318-327
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Immigrant and Minority Health
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2017

Keywords

  • Behavior
  • Ethnicity
  • Health disparities
  • Health equity
  • Immigrant
  • Minority
  • Parks
  • Perceptions
  • Race

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