Parents lose less weight than nonparents in an intensive lifestyle intervention

Carolyn T. Bramante, Rachel L.J. Thornton, Scott J. Pilla, Nisa M. Maruthur, Maya Venkataramani, Jeanne M. Clark

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: Understand whether parents lose less weight than nonparents in behavioural weight interventions. Methods: The Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes) trial randomized adults with Type 2 diabetes and overweight to an intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) or control (diabetes support and education [DSE]). Participants who reported living with a child under age 18 were designated as ‘parents’ for this analysis. Intention to treat analysis was performed of the effect of the ILI on change in weight at 1 year by parental status. Adherence to attending intervention visits was compared between parents and nonparents. Subgroup analyses were done based on previous subgroup findings in the Look AHEAD study. Results: Among 4,547 participants, 15% were parents. Parents were younger and more likely to have self-identified as African American or Hispanic/Latino. Comparing ILI with DSE, parents lost less weight than nonparents (−7.1% vs. −8.3%, p = 0.021). African American female parents lost 4% body weight compared with 7% in African American female nonparents (p = 0.01). Conclusions: In a randomized trial, parents lost less weight than nonparents, and this difference was largest for African American women. These findings suggest parents face unique challenges achieving weight loss; more research is needed to understand and optimize interventions for parents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)494-506
Number of pages13
JournalObesity Science and Practice
Volume6
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Dr. Bramante and Dr. Pilla were funded by the Behavioral Research in Heart and Vascular Disease Program Fellowship Training Program (T32HL007180‐41A1; PI: Hill‐Briggs, F.). The Look AHEAD Johns Hopkins site is funded under NIH/NIDDK grant U01DK057149 (site PI: Clark, JM). In 2019, Dr. Bramante was funded by the National Institutes of Health's National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, grants KL2TR002492 and UL1TR002494. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health's National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences.

Funding Information:
Dr. Bramante and Dr. Pilla were funded by the Behavioral Research in Heart and Vascular Disease Program Fellowship Training Program (T32HL007180-41A1; PI: Hill-Briggs, F.). The Look AHEAD Johns Hopkins site is funded under NIH/NIDDK grant U01DK057149 (site PI: Clark, JM). In 2019, Dr. Bramante was funded by the National Institutes of Health's National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, grants KL2TR002492 and UL1TR002494. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health's National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences. The authors would like to acknowledge Dr. Hsin-Chieh ?Jessica? Yeh, PhD, Associate Professor of Biostatistics, for her guidance with planning this analysis.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 The Authors. Obesity Science & Practice published by World Obesity and The Obesity Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd

Keywords

  • barriers to weight loss
  • intergenerational obesity
  • paediatric obesity
  • parental obesity

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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