Parents' Beliefs about Condoms and Oral Contraceptives: Are They Medically Accurate?

Marla E. Eisenberg, Linda H. Bearinger, Renee E. Sieving, Carolyne Swain, Michael D. Resnick

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

CONTEXT: Parents are encouraged to be the primary sex educators for their children; however, little is known about the accuracy of parents' views about condoms and oral contraceptives. METHODS: Telephone surveys using validated measures provided data on beliefs about the effectiveness, safety and usability of condoms and the pill among 1,069 parents of 13-17-year-olds in Minnesota and Wisconsin in 2002. Pearson chi-square tests and multivariate logistic regression models were used to compare beliefs according to sex, age, race, religion, education, income and political orientation. RESULTS: Substantial proportions of parents underestimated the effectiveness of condoms for preventing pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Only 47% believed that condoms are very effective for STD prevention, and 40% for pregnancy prevention. Fifty-two percent thought that use prevents pregnancy almost all the time; 39% thought that the pill is very safe. Approximately one-quarter of parents thought that most teenagers are capable of using condoms correctly; almost four in 10 thought that most teenagers can use the pill correctly. Fathers tended to have more accurate views about condoms than mothers did; mothers' views of the pill were generally more accurate than fathers'. Whites were more likely than nonwhites to hold accurate beliefs about the pill's safety and effectiveness; conservatives were less likely than liberals to hold accurate views about the effectiveness of condoms. CONCLUSION: Campaigns encouraging parents to talk with their teenagers about sexuality should provide parents with medically accurate information on the effectiveness, safety and usability of condoms and the pill.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)50-57
Number of pages8
JournalPerspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health
Volume36
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2004

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Condoms
Oral Contraceptives
contraceptive
parents
Parents
pregnancy
sexually transmitted disease
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Safety
Fathers
Pregnancy
father
Logistic Models
Mothers
political attitude
Sexuality
Religion
Chi-Square Distribution
telephone
Telephone

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Parents' Beliefs about Condoms and Oral Contraceptives : Are They Medically Accurate? / Eisenberg, Marla E.; Bearinger, Linda H.; Sieving, Renee E.; Swain, Carolyne; Resnick, Michael D.

In: Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health, Vol. 36, No. 2, 01.03.2004, p. 50-57.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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