Parental selection, number of breeding populations, and size of each population in inbred development

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Abstract

Some breeders select inbreds from many F2 or backcross breeding populations, each with relatively few progenies. Other breeders select inbreds from only a few breeding populations, each with many progenies. My objectives were to: (1) determine the relative importance of parental selection, number of breeding populations, and size of each population, and (2) find optimum combinations between number and size of breeding populations. I assumed that a breeder has resources to test a total of 2,000 recombinant inbreds for a quantitative trait that was controlled by 100 additive loci and had a heritability of 0.20, 0.60, or 1.0. The parental inbreds had an inherent pedigree structure due to advanced cycle breeding. The parental inbreds were ranked according to their mean performance, and breeding populations were made among all parents, the top 25% of parents, and the top 10% of parents. I found that the issue of number versus size of breeding populations was only secondary compared with the ability to identify, prior to making the crosses, the breeding populations with the highest mean performance. For a given level of effectiveness of parental selection, the selection response was largest when the maximum number of breeding populations was used. The effect of the number of breeding populations was minor, however, when selection was practiced among the parents or when heritability was less than 1.0. The results suggested that, in practice, large selection responses could be obtained with a wide range of combinations between number and size of breeding populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1252-1256
Number of pages5
JournalTheoretical and Applied Genetics
Volume107
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2003

Keywords

  • Breeding populations
  • Inbred development
  • Parental selection

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