Parental Divorce and First-Year College Students' Persistence and Academic Achievement

Krista M Soria, Sarah Linder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this article was to examine the relationships between parental divorce and first-year college students' persistence and academic achievement at a large public university. Using data from the 2007-2008 Cooperative Institutional Research Program survey of first-year students, the results of a logistic regression analysis suggest that students whose parents were divorced were significantly less likely to persist into their second year of study than their peers. Students whose parents were divorced also had significantly lower cumulative grade point averages. These findings held when controlling for demographic variables, precollege academic indicators, college experiences, and academic motivation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)103-116
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Divorce and Remarriage
Volume55
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

divorce
academic achievement
persistence
parents
student
first-year student
regression analysis
logistics
university
experience

Keywords

  • academic achievement
  • first-year college students
  • parental divorce
  • retention

Cite this

Parental Divorce and First-Year College Students' Persistence and Academic Achievement. / Soria, Krista M; Linder, Sarah.

In: Journal of Divorce and Remarriage, Vol. 55, No. 2, 01.01.2014, p. 103-116.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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