Parental age and the risk of childhood acute myeloid leukemia: results from the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium

FRECCLE group, NARECHEM-ST group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Parental age has been associated with several childhood cancers, albeit the evidence is still inconsistent. Aim: To examine the associations of parental age at birth with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) among children aged 0–14 years using individual-level data from the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC) and non-CLIC studies. Material/methods: We analyzed data of 3182 incident AML cases and 8377 controls from 17 studies [seven registry-based case-control (RCC) studies and ten questionnaire-based case-control (QCC) studies]. AML risk in association with parental age was calculated using multiple logistic regression, meta-analyses, and pooled-effect estimates. Models were stratified by age at diagnosis (infants <1 year-old vs. children 1–14 years-old) and by study design, using five-year parental age increments and controlling for sex, ethnicity, birthweight, prematurity, multiple gestation, birth order, maternal smoking and education, age at diagnosis (cases aged 1–14 years), and recruitment time period. Results: Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) derived from RCC, but not from the QCC, studies showed a higher AML risk for infants of mothers ≥40-year-old (OR = 6.87; 95% CI: 2.12–22.25). There were no associations observed between any other maternal or paternal age group and AML risk for children older than one year. Conclusions: An increased risk of infant AML with advanced maternal age was found using data from RCC, but not from QCC studies; no parental age-AML associations were observed for older children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)158-165
Number of pages8
JournalCancer Epidemiology
Volume59
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2019

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Acute Myeloid Leukemia
Leukemia
Parents
Case-Control Studies
Registries
Maternal Age
Odds Ratio
Paternal Age
Mothers
Confidence Intervals
Multiple Birth Offspring
Birth Order
Meta-Analysis
Age Groups
Logistic Models
Smoking
Regression Analysis
Parturition
Education
Pregnancy

Keywords

  • Childhood cancer
  • Epidemiology
  • Infant acute myeloid leukemia
  • Maternal age
  • Paternal age
  • Risk factors

Cite this

Parental age and the risk of childhood acute myeloid leukemia : results from the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium. / FRECCLE group; NARECHEM-ST group.

In: Cancer Epidemiology, Vol. 59, 04.2019, p. 158-165.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Parental age and the risk of childhood acute myeloid leukemia: results from the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium",
abstract = "Background: Parental age has been associated with several childhood cancers, albeit the evidence is still inconsistent. Aim: To examine the associations of parental age at birth with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) among children aged 0–14 years using individual-level data from the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC) and non-CLIC studies. Material/methods: We analyzed data of 3182 incident AML cases and 8377 controls from 17 studies [seven registry-based case-control (RCC) studies and ten questionnaire-based case-control (QCC) studies]. AML risk in association with parental age was calculated using multiple logistic regression, meta-analyses, and pooled-effect estimates. Models were stratified by age at diagnosis (infants <1 year-old vs. children 1–14 years-old) and by study design, using five-year parental age increments and controlling for sex, ethnicity, birthweight, prematurity, multiple gestation, birth order, maternal smoking and education, age at diagnosis (cases aged 1–14 years), and recruitment time period. Results: Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95{\%} confidence intervals (CIs) derived from RCC, but not from the QCC, studies showed a higher AML risk for infants of mothers ≥40-year-old (OR = 6.87; 95{\%} CI: 2.12–22.25). There were no associations observed between any other maternal or paternal age group and AML risk for children older than one year. Conclusions: An increased risk of infant AML with advanced maternal age was found using data from RCC, but not from QCC studies; no parental age-AML associations were observed for older children.",
keywords = "Childhood cancer, Epidemiology, Infant acute myeloid leukemia, Maternal age, Paternal age, Risk factors",
author = "{FRECCLE group} and {NARECHEM-ST group} and Paraskevi Panagopoulou and Alkistis Skalkidou and Erin Marcotte and Friederike Erdmann and Xiaomei Ma and Heck, {Julia E.} and Anssi Auvinen and Mueller, {Beth A.} and Spector, {Logan G.} and Eve Roman and Catherine Metayer and Corrado Magnani and Pombo-de-Oliveira, {Maria S.} and Scheurer, {Michael E.} and Mora, {Ana Maria} and Dockerty, {John D.} and Johnni Hansen and Kang, {Alice Y.} and Rong Wang and Doody, {David R.} and Eleanor Kane and Joachim Sch{\"u}z and Christos Christodoulakis and Evangelia Ntzani and Petridou, {Eleni Th}",
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T1 - Parental age and the risk of childhood acute myeloid leukemia

T2 - results from the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium

AU - FRECCLE group

AU - NARECHEM-ST group

AU - Panagopoulou, Paraskevi

AU - Skalkidou, Alkistis

AU - Marcotte, Erin

AU - Erdmann, Friederike

AU - Ma, Xiaomei

AU - Heck, Julia E.

AU - Auvinen, Anssi

AU - Mueller, Beth A.

AU - Spector, Logan G.

AU - Roman, Eve

AU - Metayer, Catherine

AU - Magnani, Corrado

AU - Pombo-de-Oliveira, Maria S.

AU - Scheurer, Michael E.

AU - Mora, Ana Maria

AU - Dockerty, John D.

AU - Hansen, Johnni

AU - Kang, Alice Y.

AU - Wang, Rong

AU - Doody, David R.

AU - Kane, Eleanor

AU - Schüz, Joachim

AU - Christodoulakis, Christos

AU - Ntzani, Evangelia

AU - Petridou, Eleni Th

PY - 2019/4

Y1 - 2019/4

N2 - Background: Parental age has been associated with several childhood cancers, albeit the evidence is still inconsistent. Aim: To examine the associations of parental age at birth with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) among children aged 0–14 years using individual-level data from the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC) and non-CLIC studies. Material/methods: We analyzed data of 3182 incident AML cases and 8377 controls from 17 studies [seven registry-based case-control (RCC) studies and ten questionnaire-based case-control (QCC) studies]. AML risk in association with parental age was calculated using multiple logistic regression, meta-analyses, and pooled-effect estimates. Models were stratified by age at diagnosis (infants <1 year-old vs. children 1–14 years-old) and by study design, using five-year parental age increments and controlling for sex, ethnicity, birthweight, prematurity, multiple gestation, birth order, maternal smoking and education, age at diagnosis (cases aged 1–14 years), and recruitment time period. Results: Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) derived from RCC, but not from the QCC, studies showed a higher AML risk for infants of mothers ≥40-year-old (OR = 6.87; 95% CI: 2.12–22.25). There were no associations observed between any other maternal or paternal age group and AML risk for children older than one year. Conclusions: An increased risk of infant AML with advanced maternal age was found using data from RCC, but not from QCC studies; no parental age-AML associations were observed for older children.

AB - Background: Parental age has been associated with several childhood cancers, albeit the evidence is still inconsistent. Aim: To examine the associations of parental age at birth with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) among children aged 0–14 years using individual-level data from the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC) and non-CLIC studies. Material/methods: We analyzed data of 3182 incident AML cases and 8377 controls from 17 studies [seven registry-based case-control (RCC) studies and ten questionnaire-based case-control (QCC) studies]. AML risk in association with parental age was calculated using multiple logistic regression, meta-analyses, and pooled-effect estimates. Models were stratified by age at diagnosis (infants <1 year-old vs. children 1–14 years-old) and by study design, using five-year parental age increments and controlling for sex, ethnicity, birthweight, prematurity, multiple gestation, birth order, maternal smoking and education, age at diagnosis (cases aged 1–14 years), and recruitment time period. Results: Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) derived from RCC, but not from the QCC, studies showed a higher AML risk for infants of mothers ≥40-year-old (OR = 6.87; 95% CI: 2.12–22.25). There were no associations observed between any other maternal or paternal age group and AML risk for children older than one year. Conclusions: An increased risk of infant AML with advanced maternal age was found using data from RCC, but not from QCC studies; no parental age-AML associations were observed for older children.

KW - Childhood cancer

KW - Epidemiology

KW - Infant acute myeloid leukemia

KW - Maternal age

KW - Paternal age

KW - Risk factors

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