Parent Weight, Diet, Active Living, and Food-Related Outcomes of the Family-Focused:NU-HOME Randomized Controlled Trial: NU-HOME Randomized Controlled Trial

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Abstract

Background: Little is known about parent outcomes of rural, family-focused childhood obesity prevention trials. Objective: Our aim was to evaluate parent outcomes of the rural, family-focused NU-HOME (New Ulm at HOME [Healthy Offerings via the Mealtime Environment]) randomized controlled trial designed to prevent obesity in children aged 7 through 10 years. Design: Families were randomized to the intervention or wait-list control group after baseline data collection. Staff measured parent height, weight, and percent body fat. Surveys measured parent cognitive and behavioral outcomes (eg, portion-size confidence, dietary intake, total and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, and screen time). Post-intervention data were collected 8 to 10 months after baseline. Participants/setting: The randomized controlled trial took place in rural, south central Minnesota, and enrolled parent and child dyads (N = 114; 2017-2018); 98 parents provided data at post intervention (2018-2019) and comprise the analytic sample. Parent inclusion criteria were being the primary meal preparer, living with the child most of the time, and being willing to attend intervention sessions. Exclusion criteria were planning to move or having a medical condition that would contraindicate participation. Intervention: The theory-guided intervention (7 sessions and 4 goal-setting calls) focused on family eating and active living behaviors. Main outcome measures: Height, weight, and percent body fat were measured and the survey assessed diet, active living, and food-related outcomes. Statistical analyses performed: Multiple linear regression models tested change in parent outcomes from baseline to post intervention by treatment group adjusted for demographic characteristics and baseline values. Results: In the intervention group vs control group, parent total weekly hours of physical activity was 1.73 hours higher (95% CI 0.11 to 3.35 hours) and portion-size confidence was 1.49 points higher (95% CI 0.78 to 2.19). No other statistically significant changes were observed by treatment group. Conclusions: Findings indicate that parent cognitive and behavioral outcomes are amenable to change in family-focused childhood obesity prevention programs. Parent increases in portion-size confidence and total physical activity hours may support long-term parent health and provide positive context for child health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
FUNDING/SUPPORT This study was supported by grant R01 HL123699 to J. A. Fulkerson, principal investigator, from the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health. This study also used REDCap for data collection and statistical services supported by a Clinical and Translations Science Institute grant (UL1TR002494) from the National Institutes of Health’s National Center for Advancing Translations Sciences. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute or the National Institutes of Health or the National Institutes of Health’s National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

Keywords

  • Childhood obesity prevention
  • Intervention
  • Parent outcomes
  • Randomized controlled trial
  • Rural

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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