Paper versus Pixel: Effectiveness of Paper versus Electronic Maps To Teach Map Reading Skills in an Introductory Physical Geography Course

Paula Pedersen, Pat Farrell, Eric McPhee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article addresses the lack of outcome-based research on the integration of technology into pedagogy at the undergraduate college level. It describes a study performed at a Midwestern university, testing the relative effectiveness of paper and electronic topographic maps for teaching map-reading skills, and considers the relationship between learning styles and paper or digital map preference. Results indicate that, although student map skill performance did not differ significantly with the use of paper or electronic maps, students preferred paper maps. Neither their performance nor their preferences were related to learning style. The article discusses the significance of these findings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)195-202
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Geography
Volume104
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This research project was made possible by funds from the University of Minnesota Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP). We gratefully acknowledge advice and guidance on data analysis from Kristelle Miller and Sandy Woolum, and helpful comments on the manuscript from Casey McGee.

Copyright:
Copyright 2017 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • Digital maps
  • Geographic education
  • Pedagogy
  • Teaching technology

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