Oxygen Tension in the Gut

Michael D Levitt

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A recent article1 re-examines a long-standing controversy in helminthology — does the ascaris lead an aerobic or an anaerobic existance in the human intestine. According to traditional teaching, there is insufficient oxygen in the bowel to maintain oxidative metabolism for an organism as large as Ascaris lumbricoides. However, Smith1 has marshaled evidence that the ascaris is an aerobic animal specially adapted to live at a low oxygen tension (Po2). Unfortunately, since there are practically no data concerning the oxygen tension of the human bowel, Smith was forced to rely upon measurements of Po2 in the small intestine.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1039-1040
Number of pages2
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume282
Issue number18
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 30 1970

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Ascaris
Oxygen
Ascaris lumbricoides
Small Intestine
Intestines
Teaching
Lead
carbosulfan

Cite this

Oxygen Tension in the Gut. / Levitt, Michael D.

In: New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 282, No. 18, 30.04.1970, p. 1039-1040.

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

Levitt, Michael D. / Oxygen Tension in the Gut. In: New England Journal of Medicine. 1970 ; Vol. 282, No. 18. pp. 1039-1040.
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