Outcomes for Somali immigrant kidney transplant recipients in a large-volume transplant center

Kent J. Peterson, Oscar Serrano, Marjorie Odegard, Steven J Mongin, Danielle Berglund, David M. Vock, Srinath Chinnakotla, Ty B Dunn, Erik B. Finger, Raja Kandaswamy, Timothy L. Pruett, Arthur J. Matas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: Kidney transplantation (KT) demands that patients navigate a complex healthcare system and adhere to lifelong therapy and surveillance. Cultural and linguistic discordance between patients and providers has been identified as a barrier to successful KT. We studied KT outcomes and disparities among a native Somali population living in Minnesota. Methods: Between 1995 and 2015, 2,385 patients underwent KT at our institution; 22 were self-designated Somali nationals. Patient and graft survival and time to first rejection were analyzed. Utilization of interpreter services was evaluated. Results: Patient survival for the Somali cohort at 1 year was 100% and 95.5% at 5 years; compared to 97.2% at 1 year and 89.1% at 5 years for the Caucasian cohort (p = 0.40). Graft survival for the Somali cohort at 1 year was 100% and 95.5% at 5 years; for the Caucasian cohort 94.8% and 81.6% (p = 0.35). Rejection-free survival in the Somali cohort was 100% at 1 and 5 years, for the Caucasian cohort 86.2% and 82.1 (p = 0.41). Among 22 adult Somali KT recipients, 15 (68%) patients frequently utilized interpreter services in their KT-related clinical encounters. Conclusion: Immigrant Somali KT recipients, appear to have comparable KT outcomes compared to a contemporaneous Caucasian cohort.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number100066
JournalTransplantation Reports
Volume5
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2020

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020

Keywords

  • Cultural discordance
  • Kidney transplantation
  • Linguistic discordance
  • Outcomes
  • Racial disparities
  • Somali

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