Ototoxicity of propylene glycol in experimental animals

Tetsuo Morizono, Michael M. Paparella, Steven K. Juhn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

51 Scopus citations

Abstract

The ototoxicity of antibiotics given either systemically or topically has been recently recognized. However, the ototoxicity of topically applled alcohols and other solvents used as vehicles for drugs has not been well recognized. One of the most common solvents, propylene glycol, was chosen for this study, and this agent in various concentrations was instilled into the middle ear of guinea pigs and chinchillas for various periods of time. Its effect on the function of the cochlea was studied as well as the histopathologic changes in the temporal bones. Deterioration of the cochlear microphonics and the endocochlear direct current potential was found. A 10 per cent solution applied for six days caused a reduction in the cochlear microphonics. Fifty per cent or stronger solution always caused a reduction in the cochlear microphonics. The deterioration in the cochlear microphonics persisted one month. Dose related changes in the endocochlear potential were noted. Morphologic changes were severe and included granulation tissue in the middle ear and destruction and ossification of the auditory bulla and bony cochlea. Propylene glycol should not be used in the ear that has a perforation of the tympanic membrane.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)393-399
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Otolaryngology--Head and Neck Medicine and Surgery
Volume1
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1980

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Accepted for publication July 15, 1980. This work was supported by NIH grant NS 14538. Presented at the Second Midwinter Research Meeting, Association for Research in Otolaryngology, St. Petersburg Beach, Florida, January 22, 1979. *Assistant Professor and Director, Otophysiolagy Research Laboratol'y, Department of Otolaryngology, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, Minnesota. l'Professor, Department of Otolaryngology, University of Minnesota Medical School. Professor and Chairman, Department of Otolaryngology, University of Minnesota Hospitals, Minneapolis, Minnesota. SProfessor, Department of Otolawngology, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, Minnesota.

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