"Others are influenced, but not me": Older adults' perceptions of DTC prescription drug advertising effects

Denise E. DeLorme, Jisu Huh, Leonard N. Reid

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

A series of in-depth interviews was conducted to examine older adults' perceptions of the effects of direct-to-consumer (DTC) prescription drug advertising on themselves and others. Results give empirical voice to published survey findings and provide additional evidence to support the third-person effect in DTC advertising. Findings indicate that older adults do not perceive DTC ad effects on themselves when asked directly, but do indicate behaving in DTC-ad-expected ways in particular situations. The informants also perceived different types of DTC ad effects on others and themselves. In addition, the interview data suggest that older consumers' frustration toward individual DTC ads - despite positive perceptions toward the general idea of DTC advertising - operate behind denial of DTC ad effects on self. Both cognitive and motivational explanations can be applied to understand why older adults make these types of attributions in the context of third-person DTC ad effects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)135-151
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Aging Studies
Volume21
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2007

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