Optimizing early detection strategies: defining the effective attraction radius of attractants for emerald ash borer Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire

Jacob T. Wittman, Peter Silk, Katie Parker, Brian H. Aukema

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Adult emerald ash borers are attracted to green prism traps baited with the ash host volatile (3Z)-hexenol and the sex pheromone of emerald ash borer (3Z)-dodecen-12-olide [(3Z)-lactone]. Quantifying the heretofore unknown range of attraction of such traps would help optimize deployment strategies for early detection. Examining trap captures of traps deployed in pairs at variable distances offers insight into the range of attraction. Recent work has shown the range of attraction can be estimated as half the intertrap distance at which trap catch begins to decrease, which should occur when proximate traps overlap their respective attractive ranges. We estimated these traps' attractive range for emerald ash borer using 98 baited dark green prism traps deployed in pairs, one trap per tree, in an urban park in Saint Paul, Minnesota, USA in summer 2020. We estimate attractive range by fitting a logistic model to trap catch data using Bayesian inferential methods and describe advantages thereof. The attractive range of these baited traps was estimated to be between 16 and 73 m, with a median of 28 m. We recommend that dark green prism traps baited with these semiochemicals be placed 25–35 m apart near high-risk entry points.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)527-535
Number of pages9
JournalAgricultural and Forest Entomology
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We thank the Three Rivers Park District, Minnesota and Ramsey County Parks and Recreation, Minnesota for help locating a suitable field site. Aubree Kees, Patrick Perish, Alexa Koch, and Pheylan Anderson (University of Minnesota) helped with trap assembly and deployment, as well as specimen collection. Marie Hallinen (University of Minnesota) provided useful comments on a previous draft of this manuscript. Peter Mayo of the Canadian Forest Service, Natural Resources Canada synthesized the lactone. This work was made possible by Minnesota Agricultural Experiment Station project MIN-17-095. Three anonymous reviewers provided comments on a previous draft that improved this manuscript.

Funding Information:
We thank the Three Rivers Park District, Minnesota and Ramsey County Parks and Recreation, Minnesota for help locating a suitable field site. Aubree Kees, Patrick Perish, Alexa Koch, and Pheylan Anderson (University of Minnesota) helped with trap assembly and deployment, as well as specimen collection. Marie Hallinen (University of Minnesota) provided useful comments on a previous draft of this manuscript. Peter Mayo of the Canadian Forest Service, Natural Resources Canada synthesized the lactone. This work was made possible by Minnesota Agricultural Experiment Station project MIN‐17‐095. Three anonymous reviewers provided comments on a previous draft that improved this manuscript.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 The Royal Entomological Society

Keywords

  • (3Z)-hexenol
  • (3Z)-lactone
  • Bayesian
  • invasive insects
  • pheromone trap
  • rapid response

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