Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma: Definition of Intraorbital, Intracanalicular, and Intracranial Components with Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Bertil Lindblom, Charles L. Truwit, William F. Hoyt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

50 Scopus citations

Abstract

Magnetic resonance imaging with fat saturation after the administration of gadolinium-DTPA can detect and demarcate meningioma of the optic nerve sheath with a precision not attainable with any other current imaging technique. This article describes some of the clinical implications of this technique and illustrates the appearance of this tumor on magnetic resonance images.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)560-566
Number of pages7
JournalOphthalmology
Volume99
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1992

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Originally received: August 9, 1991. Revision accepted: November II, 1991. I Neuro-Ophthalmology Unit, Departments of Neurological Surgery and Ophthalmology, School of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco. 2 Neuroradiology Section, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco. 3 U.S. Army Medical Department, Academy of Health Science, HSHAGPS, FSN, Texas. Dr. Lindblom is on leave of absence from the Department of Ophthalmology, University of Goteborg, Sahlgren's Hospital, Goteborg, Sweden. Supported by Foreningen De Blindas Vanner, Goteborg, The SwedenAmerica Foundation, Stockholm, Bertil and Carmen Regners Fond, Stockholm, Karin Sandqvists Stiftelse, Stockholm, and Wenner-Gren Center Foundation, Stockholm.

Copyright:
Copyright 2017 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

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